Top 5 Codecademy Alternatives

By
Sun, 16 Sep 2018

Nearly everyone from the most respected pundits to high school guidance counselors are recommending that people learn to code. Pretty soon even street preachers will be in on it. Whether you're looking to retrain from your current career, brush up on some old skills, or just get better at a new hobby, learning to code can be useful and fun. And while Codecademy is one of the best ways to do so, some people bounce off their pedagogy. Our list covers all kinds of learning styles and levels. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Best Codecademy Alternatives

  1. freeCodeCamp: Build your resume as you learn
  2. Udacity: Provides accreditation for cheap
  3. edX: Comes with a prestigious pedigree
  4. Codewars: Learn competitively
  5. Khan Academy: Great for visual learners

Coding Bootcamp vs. Self-Study

Two of the main avenues of learning to code are bootcamps and self-study programs. All of the online options listed here qualify as the latter. There are also textbooks, community college and undergraduate degrees available as well, of course.

Feature Bootcamp Self-Study
Learn to work with others
Develop at your own pace
Free or inexpensive
Creates a network
Pick and choose what will be useful for you
Fully immersive

What's The Best Approach To Learning To Code?

What Can I Do With Code?

  • Make a website. Basic knowledge of HTML and CSS will allow you to build a website from the ground up, or fully utilize tools like Wordpress.
  • Build an app. Mobile phones are the future of computing. Learning to code will let you bring your great idea to the masses.
  • Make a game. Videogames are a growing sector of arts and business. Whether you want to make something small and unique in Twine or Unity or build something from the ground up, you'll need to know at least the basics.
  • Solve problems. The basic purpose of coding is to fix something that's broken, or to make something new. As long as you have a problem that can be solved, or at least helped, by software, learning to code is a necessary step in tackling it.

Conclusion

Learning to code on your own time isn't a task to take lightly. Between the huge supply of new coders looking for jobs and the constant turnover in coding languages, making a career out of it is no small feat. And even if you simply want to do hobbyist work, it's imperative to work hard just to gain functional knowledge. But the effort is often worth it. The greatest aspect of Codecademy and its alternatives is that they're available whether you want to learn enough to pass a bootcamp test or brush up on some skills you've been developing for decades. Plus, they're diverse enough to suit almost any kind of student.

In Depth

Are you interested in becoming a web developer? Codecademy.com is an interactive online platform for aspiring techies looking to learn to code. Offering both free and paid memberships, Codecademy can school you in twelve different programming languages. But what if this particular platform isn't for you? The options out there are endless, and with so many floating around it can be hard to figure out which site will be best suited to your needs. We took a look at the top five alternatives for those looking to make the best and most informed choice.

Kicking things off at #5 is Khan Academy, a nonprofit and completely free online learning platform backed by well known investors such as Google, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Khan Academy has a vast selection of classes in subjects that range from physics and chemistry to economics, art history, and finance. They boast a reputable computer programming section that is filled with introductory courses for new learners. This website relies mostly on video instruction, making it ideal for visual students.

The step by step structure, community of collaboration and low price point make Khan Academy a great option for beginners who are looking to explore the world of coding for the first time.

The step by step structure, community of collaboration and low price point make Khan Academy a great option for beginners who are looking to explore the world of coding for the first time.

The #4 spot belongs to Codewars.com. If you have a competitive streak and love to go head to head in a pressure cooker style that resembles ninja training, then this is the coding site for you. Channeling Japanese martial arts, Codewars uses programming tasks called kata to train your abilities. This free website offers 20+ programming languages in which you must refine and prove your skill. Users need to have some knowledge of the language they choose to perform challenges in order to earn rank and honor.

There is also a space to share and discuss your solutions with other members for a truly collaborative experience. Codewars is a great alternative for ambitious learners who already have a basic knowledge of coding.

Taking the #3 spot is e d X.org. It was founded by MIT and Harvard faculty and is an established place to learn to program. Boasting courses from prestigious institutions such as Boston University and UC Berkeley, it is a way to get a taste of college life for nontraditional students. This site provides open courses that are complete with video lectures, discussion forums, peer assessments, and graded tests. No prerequisites are required to start.

This site provides open courses that are complete with video lectures, discussion forums, peer assessments, and graded tests.

Though it is a not for profit organization, users can choose to make donations to fuel the improvement of the site and to receive verified certificates in return. It's a great resource for beginners looking for university style classes for little to no cost.

Coming in at #2 is Udacity.com. Udacity is an online, for profit educational organization founded by former Google VP Sebastian Thrun. This website offers both free and paid open courses in an array of subjects for beginners and intermediates. They can help you get a recognizable certification for a fraction of traditional tuition costs. To do this, you opt in for a nanodegree in the field of your choice. It only costs a few hundred dollars per month. If you graduate within one year, you receive half your tuition back.

They also provide a host of introductory and intermediate courses for free to stay sharp in the world of coding. Udacity provides chat guidance, video lectures, quizzes, problem sets, and real teachers to keep things on track. Some courses even provide a test checker to help ensure you've got your answers right. This site is best for less advanced coders looking to learn from scratch or get a qualifiable accreditation to serve as a bridge for jobs in the industry.

Some courses even provide a test checker to help ensure you've got your answers right.

And finally, the #1 top alternative to Codecademy is freeCodeCamp.org. This website, as the title suggests, is entirely free. It also boasts an open source codebase, meaning there is a collaborative atmosphere where you'll get to learn from plenty of your peers. One of the biggest pros to this website is their emphasis on portfolio work.

With nearly as many programming languages available as Codecademy to choose from, freeCodeCamp immerses you in interactive challenges and development work, plus hundreds of hours contributing to real projects for nonprofit organizations. Having this tangible work builds your portfolio and positions you ahead of other candidates looking for entry level developer jobs. Plus, they offer certificates after completing each subject, which rewards your work and helps you track your progress.

This option is great for beginners with no previous coding knowledge looking to test the waters and potentially land a job, all while helping nonprofits and never paying a dime.

This option is great for beginners with no previous coding knowledge looking to test the waters and potentially land a job, all while helping nonprofits and never paying a dime.

Everyone learns differently and has to work around varying schedules. It's important to choose a platform that supports your learning style and budget, while also keeping you motivated and entertained. There is no one size fits all answer. It's best to try out multiple alternatives and even supplement and mix and match on your coding journey. The first step is knowing that you want to learn. After that, you just need to explore your options.