Updated April 15, 2019 by Karen Bennett

The 6 Best AED Trainers

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

We spent 23 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. An AED trainer is an effective tool for teaching people how to use an automated external defibrillator in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. These electronic learning devices mimic real, lifesaving ones, but without administering the electric shock. Here we rank them for design, important features, and helpful accessories. Note that these are only for training, and not for clinical purposes. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best aed trainer on Amazon.

6. XFT Mini

5. WNL Products Practi-Trainer

4. Prestan Professional

3. American Red Cross Device

2. CPR Savers Unit

1. Prestan UltraTrainer

Editor's Notes

April 12, 2019:

Each of the choices here provides clear, confident voice prompts to teach students how to use a clinical AED, in a safe practice environment that does not involve electric shock. Most of the ones that made our list can be played in either English or Spanish, and several are conveniently upgradable when the AHA publishes new guidelines – which can save you a bundle in the long run. All the selections here conveniently come with pads and simulated electrodes.

The Prestan UltraTrainer is from a well-known maker of medical training devices, and it offers a generous warranty and built-in metronome to help time chest compressions. For a choice that can’t get much easier to use, look to the American Red Cross Device, which features prominent buttons and an easy-to-control volume dial. And, if you need several units for your students, you’ll get more bang for your buck by purchasing them in a four-pack.

Almost all of the selections listed here come with handy carrying cases with room for the device and all the included accessories. No matter which you choose, be sure it offers all of the features you require. And remember, these are for training purposes only and not for clinical use.


Karen Bennett
Last updated on April 15, 2019 by Karen Bennett

Karen Bennett lives in Chicago with her family, and when she’s not writing, she can usually be found practicing yoga or cheering on her kids at soccer games. She holds a master’s.degree in journalism and a bachelor’s in English, and her writing has been published in various local newspapers, as well as “The Cheat Sheet,” “Illinois Legal Times,” and “USA Today.” She has also written search engine news page headlines and worked as a product manager for a digital marketing company. Her expertise is in literature, nonfiction, textbooks, home products, kids' games and toys, hardware, teaching accessories, and art materials.


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