Updated June 16, 2020 by Rafael Perez

The 8 Best Anchor Lines

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This wiki has been updated 7 times since it was first published in July of 2018. Whether you're looking to moor at a dock, or anchor at sea or on a lake while you enjoy the scenery, you'll want to ensure your vessel is safe and secure when it's not in motion. Made from a range of durable materials, these lines deliver the strength and elasticity needed to keep boats in place even when the weather turns. Remember to select the right diameter for the size of your boat. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best anchor line on Amazon.

8. Airhead Bungee

7. Powerline USA

6. SGT Knots

5. Invincible Marine BR52709

4. Redneck Convent

3. Dark Horse Marine RC-0250

2. Norestar Premium

1. Extreme Max BoatTector

Editor's Notes

June 12, 2020:

Added the Dark Horse Marine RC-0250.

Nylon ropes like the Extreme Max BoatTector are the most common rodes used because of the properties of braided nylon: excellent elasticity, abrasion resistance, and fair UV protection. Elasticity is often a welcomed characteristic for anchoring since it helps dampen the forces that may put too much stress on your boat's components. The Dark Horse Marine RC-0250 is compatible with windlasses and also incorporates a chain which helps set the anchor and protects the rode from breaking due to rocks and other debris near the seabed. We should note however that we included the polyester SGT Knots and promoted its lack of elasticity. This is because there are many scenarios where an elastic rope is undesirable (running rigging, towing, etc.). If your polyester rope is not dampening enough, you can always let out some more rode.

If you need to determine the length of anchor line you need, just calculate it by multiplying the maximum expected anchoring depth by 8; for 30 feet deep, you'll need a 240-foot rode. For rope diameter, you need an 1/8th of an inch for every 9 feet of boat; for a 27 foot boat you'll need a 3/8th-inch diameter rode.


Rafael Perez
Last updated on June 16, 2020 by Rafael Perez

Rafael Perez is a doctoral candidate in philosophy at the University of Rochester. His primary focus is the metaphysics of time and the philosophy of mind, with a particular interest in artificial intelligence and antirepresentational models of the mind. He has extensive experience as a mechanic, a construction worker, and a general repairman. This has allowed him to gather a wealth of knowledge on automobile repair, auto parts, carpentry, masonry, welding, and the tools used in those trades. In his spare time, he enjoys playing guitar, woodworking, and fishing.


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