Updated September 11, 2020 by Brett Dvoretz

The 10 Best Ceramic Grills

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 7 times since it was first published in November of 2018. Ceramic barbecues are modern versions of the Japanese kamado, a traditional earthenware cooking urn that dates back over 3,000 years. The reason they have been around so long is due to the versatility they offer. You can grill, bake, and smoke inside them, allowing you to prepare a range of different dishes. Because they are well insulated, they are also more efficient than standard grills. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best ceramic grill on Amazon.

10. Grill Dome Infinity Series

9. Char-Griller 6520 Akorn

8. Vision Pro Kamado CF1F1

7. George Foreman Pro

6. Lonestar Chef SCS-K22B

5. Primo XL

4. Pit Boss 22-inch

3. BBQ Guru Monolith

2. Duluth Forge 1400 DF-CC

1. Kamado Joe Classic III

Special Honors

Grilla Grills Kong The Grilla Grills Kong offers a total of 634 square inches of cooking space across its two levels, making it suitable for large families and those who like to entertain friends often. Its included grates are made from stainless steel, so they shouldn't rust with age, and it has a slide plate on the bottom and a cast aluminum damper at the top to adjust the airflow to suit your needs. grillagrills.com

Big Green Egg Available in multiple sizes with grid diameters ranging from 10 to 29 inches, there is a Big Green Egg to suit every need. Though it, unfortunately, doesn't come with any accessories, the company makes a slew of them, from covers to stands to baking stones, that you can purchase separately, and which will work with it seamlessly. biggreenegg.com

Editor's Notes

September 08, 2020:

If you have ever found your regular grill inadequate, especially when it comes to heat retention, it may be time to give a kamado a try. Crafted from thick ceramic, they excel at holding heat and are ideal for slow cooking large cuts of meat without using an excessive quantity of charcoal. That being said, they aren't one trick ponies and are equally useful for cooking food quickly at high heats. Plus, with an adjustable air intake in the bottom and vent at the top, they can also be used for smoking, so you'll no longer need both a grill and a dedicated smoker taking up space in your backyard.

In our most recent update, we replaced the Kamado Joe Classic II with the Kamado Joe Classic III. The latter boasts the company's patented Slōroller hyperbolic smoke chamber, which makes it better suited to indirect cooking. It also offers three tiers instead of two, giving you more versatility in how close you want to place your food to the charcoal. Additionally, we like that they have upgraded the side tables to be aluminum rather than plastic, which they were on the Classic II.

We also replaced the BBQ Guru Monolith DigiQ with the BBQ Guru Monolith that comes with the UltraQ. This latter control unit offers more more features than the former, such as the ability to connect to three probes, a timer, voice control via Alexa, Bluetooth connectivity, and more. The grill itself is the same in both models.

Since kamados are notoriously expensive, we decided to include the Char-Griller 6520 Akorn, which is actually made from triple-walled steel instead of ceramic. While perhaps not fully equal in regards to heat retention to ceramic models, it does come close and is a fraction of the price, making it ideal for those who just can't stomach the cost of traditional kamados, but are hoping to replicate the cooking experience somehow.

November 09, 2018:

When finding the best ceramic grills we took a number of different properties into account. Since the majority of these will spend most of their time outdoors, we wanted to find models that can withstand exposure to the elements for years. We also made sure to include models capable of extremely hot temperatures, but that still offered convenient ways to control the heat and airflow for precise cooking.


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on September 11, 2020 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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