The 10 Best Commercial Blenders

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We spent 45 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Perfect for pulverizing ice, fruit, vegetables, and whatever else you may need reduced to a smooth puree, these commercial blenders have the "juice" to handle daily duty in bars and restaurants. Of course, if you're the kind of person who likes to host a lot of garden parties and barbecues, you might want to try one at home for smoothies and daiquiris, too. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best commercial blender on Amazon.

10. Oster Versa RV0

9. Hamilton Beach HBB908

8. LA Vegan Shark

7. Ninja Professional 1000

6. Cleanblend 3HP 1800-Watt

5. Waring Xtreme Hi-Power

4. Blendtec Total

3. Jamba Appliances 58916

2. Cuisinart CBT-2000 Hurricane Pro

1. Vitamix Professional Series 750

Blending With Powers Beyond Science

Go on out to the grocery store and get yourself some whole kale, coffee beans, and frozen pineapple.

The blender as we know it is a pretty simple machine. A motor turns at one half of a coupling. The other half of that coupling is the underside of a blade assembly that seals into the base of a pitcher.

Fill the pitcher up with goodies and watch as the power of the motor translates through the coupling and into the blades that pulverize the food.

Sounds easy enough, right? Sure, if we're talking about bananas and milk, maybe even a little ice cream. But you can eat those things with great ease. Your blender doesn't need to be much more powerful or better designed for mastication than that meager mouth of yours.

Go on out to the grocery store and get yourself some whole kale, coffee beans, and frozen pineapple. Come home and try to chew on a mouthful of that. Suddenly, we need more power don't we? We need a better design.

The professional versions of this rather rudimentary blender breakdown take those basic elements and superpower them. It's kind of like taking Wolverine, who was already pretty awesome–what with the whole regenerative invincibility thing he had going on–, and coating his skeleton with adamantium.

To be clear, I don't mean to imply that any of these blenders has an adamantium blade. That would be silly. What almost all of them do have are supercharged motors, steel blade assemblies, shatter-resistant containers, and solid warranties.

The SUV Of Kitchen Appliances?

Here's an interesting question: Do you own a restaurant, smoothie shop, or coffee house?

You don't need to be a business owner to deserve and get a lot of great use out of a commercial blender, but it doesn't hurt to know what you're going to be using it for and how often you plan on using it.

You might be tempted to consider the more expensive blenders on this list the way that I consider most SUVs on the road.

This is often true of SUVs, but it isn't true of these blenders.

They're functional vehicles that can do more than almost any other cars, but the most off-roading they ever see is sand that the wind blows from the beach onto the roads nearest the ocean. In other words, people buy them because they can do things for which those people will never use them.

This is often true of SUVs, but it isn't true of these blenders.

In the spirit of honesty, I should divulge that I worked for one of these blender companies in what increasingly seems to have been a former life. One thing I noticed from my interactions with our customers is that the features and capabilities that most customers didn't even know about when they bought the machine became some of their favorite applications.

People would buy a machine just to get their kids to drink some kale that the other blenders couldn't handle, and they'd find themselves making their own peanut butter and cooking soups as much as anything else.

Now, if you're on a budget, and you're not terribly interested in anything but those smoothies, you might survive a purchase lower on our list.

If, however, you're doing this research because you've decided it's time to make a serious investment in your health and your kitchen–or you do, in fact, have a professional shop–, you need to go home with number one or number three.

The Blender Of My Childhood

If you had asked me when I was a teenager when the first blender came out, I probably would have said that it premiered some time in the 70s or 80s, since we very clearly had history's first blender in our kitchen.

It was loud, weak, and overly complicated. Also, teenagers don't have any perspective.

That is, with the notable exception of our recommended machines.

Little did I know that the first blenders arrived in the early 20s, an invention by Stephen Poplawski that he sold to drug stores for the purpose of making malted milkshakes.

Not long after that, the Vitamix hit the market, introducing an incredible amount of power into the blending field.

The biggest problem with the Vitamix in those days was that it had a steel container, so you couldn't see what was going on inside it.

Competitors cut every corner imaginable, but added the benefit of a glass container, and the blender wars were born.

Now, you can get a dozen different blenders with a thousand different features, and nearly none of them will do the simple things you want them to do.

That is, with the notable exception of our recommended machines.

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Christopher Thomas
Last updated on August 23, 2018 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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