10 Best Blenders For Your Kitchen | March 2017

We spent 26 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Looking to make healthier food options for your family? These blenders for your kitchen will pulse, puree and juice fruits, vegetables and more effortlessly, while retaining all the food's nutrients and vitamins in their most natural form. Skip to the best blenders for your kitchen on Amazon.
10 Best Blenders For Your Kitchen | March 2017


Overall Rank: 7
Best Mid-Range
★★★
Overall Rank: 1
Best High-End
★★★★★
Overall Rank: 9
Best Inexpensive
★★★
10
The powerful Oster Reverse Motor blender offers dual direction blade technology that automatically moves its 6-point, stainless steel blade in reverse in order to prevent jams. However, securing the jar to the base can be somewhat difficult.
9
The Cuisinart PowerBlend features a large, 56-ounce glass jar with a clear, 2-ounce measured pouring lid. Many of its components are easy to remove, as well. Unfortunately, it can emit a burning plastic odor when running at higher speeds for a long time.
8
The Vremi Professional has an adjustable speed dial to give you optimal control over your blending needs. It also features buttons for smoothie, ice crushing and pulse modes. The modern stainless steel design looks great on the countertop, too.
  • suction-fit rubber lid
  • nonslip feet on the base
  • strong pulverizing power
Brand Vremi
Model pending
Weight 12.5 pounds
7
The Cleanblend Commercial Blender has a 3-horsepower motor, and a stainless steel enclosed blade assembly that quickly liquefies fruits and vegetables for maximum nutrient or vitamin extraction. It's difficult to store, though, as it is very tall.
  • virtually unbreakable container
  • tamper wand to aid in blending
  • the base tends to rust over time
Brand Cleanblend
Model 2001
Weight 11 pounds
6
The KitchenAid KSB1570ER has a soft start feature and Intelli-Speed motor that senses the contents and adjusts the speed as necessary to ensure everything is perfectly blended. It has the classic blender control board with 5 speed buttons and options for ice or pulse.
  • steel-reinforced coupler
  • large 56-ounce container
  • quality made in the usa
Brand KitchenAid
Model KSB1570ER
Weight 12.3 pounds
5
The Jamba Appliances Quiet Shield is, as the name implies, one of the quietest blenders out there. This is due to the unique blending shield, which is placed over the entire unit when it is in operation. It comes with a full-sized container and a single-serve one.
  • infinite speed control
  • dishwasher safe components
  • low-profile design
Brand Jamba Appliances
Model 58916
Weight 12 pounds
4
With its high-torque power base, and 600-watt motor, the NutriBullet Magic Bullet has no problem pulverizing your fruits, vegetables, and other superfoods into delicious, nutrient-packed meals. However, it can only make single-serve smoothies.
  • super portable design
  • three colors to choose from
  • very loud when blending
Brand NutriBullet
Model NBR-12
Weight 8.1 pounds
3
The Blendtec Total Blender Classic delivers professional-quality results, thanks to its preprogrammed blending cycles, digital touchpad controls, 2-prong stainless steel blades, and commercial power motor with enough strength to plow through ice cubes.
  • lid fits very securely
  • high-capacity square blending jar
  • user guide and recipes are included
Brand Blendtec
Model TB-621-20
Weight 9.7 pounds
2
The Ninja Mega Kitchen System comes with multiple blending containers, including one 8-Cup food processor bowl and a two single-serve cups, making it an extremely versatile unit. It also features a unique three-layer blade for thorough blending every time.
  • can be used to make dough
  • 1500 watt 2 horsepower motor
  • blades are very sharp
Brand Ninja
Model BL770
Weight 16.5 pounds
1
The Vitamix 7500 offers a high-performance, 2.2-horsepower motor with durable stainless steel blades that chop through the toughest of ingredients with ease. Its low-profile design allows it to fit easily under most kitchen cabinets.
  • creates creamy soups and smoothies
  • bpa-free 64-ounce container
  • illuminated control panel
Brand Vitamix
Model 1969
Weight 19.7 pounds

More Than Just a Blender?

That's a picture of the blender I had when I was a kid, and I'm willing to bet that it's the picture that comes to most people's minds when then think about blenders. It's like a Platonic Ideal; in our heads, a blender must consist of these aspects of blenderness for it to qualify as a blender.

I don't know if you've ever owned a blender like that, but they kind of stink. We also had ourselves a dedicated electric ice crusher that we had to use to crush our ice before adding it to the blender, or else the blender couldn't do that thing it was supposed to do–you know, blend. If that's an ideal, let's innovate.

That innovation has actually gone on for quite a while, but it's only been recently that a wave of popularity hit the smoothie industry, with places like Jamba Juice and Smoothie King opening worldwide, in competition with the boutique juice and smoothie bars on every urban street corner. I mean, you know a product is popular when it threatens a global brand (like Coca-Cola), and that brand has to write skeptical think pieces about the pitfalls of smoothie consumption.

The most innovative of these blending products, those that bring you the most power, versatility, and durability, don't come cheap. But, then again, neither do the smoothies at your favorite shop.

The top blenders today, your Vitamixes and Blendtecs, can also replace items like juicers, ice cream makers, food processors, nut butter grinders, and they can even heat foods within their containers. They can cook.

Well, maybe you never wanted an ice cream maker. Do you eat ice cream? Make it yourself, and save some money. Maybe you never wanted a butter churn in your kitchen. Do you eat butter? Make it yourself, with unique flavors from garlic and fresh spices.

The bottom line is that these are not my parent's blenders. They're your blenders, and they're pretty awesome.

Are You Gonna Eat That?

Some foods you just don't want to eat. Take these natto beans, a gooey, fermented staple of the Japanese breakfast, for example. It doesn't matter how good it is for you; everybody has individual tastes and desires and some things will always be plain nasty.

Of course, that doesn't mean you can't expand your horizons. You know what? Here's a recipe for natto beans. Enjoy!

It's entirely possible that all you want to do is make smoothies, and that's the only thing you're ever going to ask of your blender. If that's the case, you probably don't need to go with one of the more expensive blenders on the market. That said, if you're going to compare your smoothie with what you buy from Jamba Juice, the cheaper guys won't cut it.

And if that day comes when you do want to explore the other possibilities your blender can offer, you're going to end up upgrading anyway and sending your cheap-o unit off to a live in a landfill in Ghana.

If you think about it, a lot of kitchen appliances are like stepping stones toward a better version of themselves. You eventually get a better stove, a bigger refrigerator–maybe one with its own TV–, a faster toaster that holds more bread, etc. You'll eventually get a better blender, too. It's up to you whether you start out early along that path or jump straight to the end.

Everything Old Is New Again

Like infomercials? I used to stay up all night watching those things, convincing myself I needed everything I saw until I started getting a little older. Then I just watched them out of a kind of morbid curiosity. Well, if you like infomercials, I suggest you watch this one, which is believed to be the first ever infomercial for a commercial product broadcast into people's homes.

Does the machine in that 66 year old infomercial look familiar? Well, it might. It's an old Vitamix. You see, these higher powered blenders have been with us since blenders were first introduced to the marketplace in the 20s and 30s.

Somewhere along the lines, companies became content to make a cheaper, less effective product for consumers. But the stronger, more capable machines that predated those later products didn't just disappear, they reoriented themselves and became the standard tools of the culinary industry.

Now, primarily due to the financial stresses of the Great Recession, consumers have become much smarter about the products in which they choose to invest. That means that if a product isn't going to last, if it can't do what it claims, if it's not made in the US, well, like I said, it goes to Ghana.

Consumers are smarter about what they buy than at any other moment in history, and machines with the power and versatility available today will make for a lot of savings tomorrow.



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Last updated: 03/22/2017 | Authorship Information

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