Updated November 17, 2019 by Gia Vescovi-Chiordi

The 10 Best Duvet Inserts

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This wiki has been updated 20 times since it was first published in January of 2016. In combination with a good cover, one of these cozy duvet inserts will keep you warm every night and let you make the bed the next morning in a few seconds by ditching your pile of top sheets and blankets. They're soft and comfortable, and we've included options with hypoallergenic fills to keep you sneeze and congestion-free, as well as models perfect for hot or cold sleepers. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best duvet insert on Amazon.

10. LinenSpa Comforter

9. Utopia Bedding Plush

8. Puredown 600 Fill Power

7. Pinzon by Amazon Year Round

6. Dreamstead by Cuddledown

5. Equinox International White

4. Royal Hotel Overfilled

3. GrayEagle Bedding Co. All Season

2. Superior Solid

1. Egyptian Bedding Premium

Special Honors

Feathered Friends Bavarian The Bavarian 700 series from Feathered Friends is a solid choice for year-round comfort. Its high lofting, Eastern European goose down provides outstanding warmth with limited weight to keep you sleeping comfortably all through the night. It's available in three different weights — light for warm sleepers, medium for temperate climates, and arctic for chilly rooms. The sewn-through construction keeps the contents from shifting and it boasts 700-plus fill power. featheredfriends.com

Riley Goose Down With a 300 thread count cotton sateen weave and attractive sateen dobby striping, the Riley Goose Down Comforter is as beautiful as it is comfortable. It comes in All-Season and Extra Warm varieties and carries the Responsible Down Standard certification, which means that the entire supply chain is strictly governed by standards that ensure humane animal treatment as well as the highest quality down. For added reassurance, it comes backed by a five-year warranty. rileyhome.com

Casper Humidity Fighting If you're a hot sleeper or live in a humid climate, then the Casper Humidity Fighting offers an ideal solution with its added layer of merino wool that naturally wicks moisture away. It's designed in the USA and sewn in India, is OEKO-TEX 100 certified, backed by a year warranty, and can be machine washed and dried. casper.com

Editor's Notes

November 13, 2019:

How you choose the right duvet insert largely depends on the type of sleeper you are and the climate you live in, which is why this list has options with varying fill powers, types of fill, and shell materials, as well as selections for twins, fulls, queens, kings, and California kings. Some, like the Dreamstead by Cuddledown and Egyptian Bedding Premium, are ideal for chilly bedrooms and climates, while the Pinzon by Amazon Year Round and Equinox International White are lightweight enough for the warmer seasons. All of the items on our list are compatible with duvet covers, even the oversized GrayEagle Bedding Co. All Season. Some have lovely piping and subtle stripes that lend them well to displaying uncovered, too.

We said goodbye to Clara Clark Luxury, which is still a nice choice, but not compelling enough to go toe-to-toe with the recently added Superior Solid. Additionally, the Bedsure Reversible was let go due to availability concerns, but don't worry if you still want a two-tone design — the LinenSpa Comforter can help you there.

A huge concern with duvets and comforters is that they are difficult to care for. For that reason, we prioritized items that can be machine washed and dried, or at least machine washed and air-dried. You will find a few dry clean only options, however, and it's best to follow these directions, as machine washing will almost certainly damage them. For models that can be put in the dryer, make sure to check your heat settings to ensure they don't get scorched, as many have a heat threshold you cannot surpass.

What Is A Duvet Insert, Anyway?

The trouble with traditional comforters is that they can be a pain to clean, as they're relatively bulky and can be difficult to fit into residential washing machines.

There are plenty of ways to keep warm through the night, but none quite as versatile and reliable as the duvet insert. Duvet inserts are essentially extra-insulating blankets that are meant to be secured inside of a decorative, protective duvet cover.

There are a number of advantages to using a duvet insert. First, its cover can be easily removed for maintenance. The trouble with traditional comforters is that they can be a pain to clean, as they're relatively bulky and can be difficult to fit into residential washing machines. Additionally, comforters often come with specific care instructions that aren't always straightforward, and that you may not even be able to accomplish on your own at home. So, if you don't have the time or energy to lug your entire bedding set to your local dry cleaner every few weeks, a duvet insert is a great alternative.

Duvet inserts are also ideal for those who enjoy updating the look of their bedroom on a regular basis. With an insert, you can switch out your cover's print or pattern for another as frequently as you change your sheets. There are tons of different duvet covers available, which means you'll be able to express your sense of personal style as the seasons change.

In plainest terms, a duvet insert will help make the task of keeping a cozy, pristine bed much simpler. It's a cost-effective choice that any interior design enthusiast will appreciate. Plus, they're just as comfortable as a quilt or comforter, and much more customizable.

The Types Of Inserts Available

No matter how specific your sleeping preferences are, there's an insert out there that's just right for your needs. One of the most important features of the duvet insert is what's inside. Many inserts are filled with materials like down feathers, wool, or silk. Individuals who suffer from allergies might instead choose from among down alternative duvet inserts, which are packed with synthetic, hypoallergenic stuffing that won't irritate the senses. Alternative stuffing is usually made from polyester that's specially engineered to feel equally as warm and fluffy as actual down.

Most inserts come with quilt-style stitching to keep the stuffing evenly distributed.

Remember: labels can be deceiving. Be on alert for products described solely by the word "down", as it's possible they contain other materials in addition to a smaller percentage of feathers. If you're on the hunt for quality, scrutinize your potential purchase's packaging to ensure you understand exactly what the product is made of.

Obviously, duvet inserts come in the same range of sizes and shapes as comforters and sheets, so you're certain to find a match for your bed, whether you're shopping for a modest twin or a generous California king. As a styling tip, consider picking out a duvet insert that's slightly larger than the size of your bed for maximum coverage and an elegant appearance.

Duvet inserts are available at several price points, as well. Prices often reflect details such as stuffing material or thread count. But don't automatically assume that a higher thread count is superior. Take into account the contents of your insert before opting for the softest weave. If the insert you're interested in is filled with down, it would be wise to go for a slightly lower thread count and therefore a more dense weave in order to prevent feathers from penetrating the shell.

One of the most crucial aspects of the duvet insert is how its fill is divided. Most inserts come with quilt-style stitching to keep the stuffing evenly distributed. Others have simple parallel stitches that extend across the width of the blanket.

Fill power is a term used to describe the area one ounce of filling occupies within the insert. This number will assist you in deciding which product is best suited to your comfort preferences. What you need to know when shopping for a new insert is that the higher the fill power, the more insulating the insert will feel as you sleep. Common fill power figures fall between 400 and 800.

Other Details To Consider

Before rushing out to buy that duvet insert, take a moment to think about some of the additional variables that could impact your purchase. For instance, maybe your sleeping preferences change with the seasons. In the dead of winter, it can be tempting to buy the thickest insert on the market, but don't be impulsive. Bear in mind you'll likely use that same insert during the summer months, too.

When it comes to shell material, natural fibers like cotton tend to be softest.

Similarly, take into account the climate in which you live. If the weather in your area changes frequently throughout the year, perhaps a medium fill power would suit your situation best. Adding warmth using blankets and throws is an easy and quick fix on those cold winter nights. People who live in warm-weather regions would be best served by an insert with synthetic filling, which tends to retain less heat.

As you browse duvet inserts, you might come across a metric called a tog rating. Tog ratings offer another simple method for determining just how much warmth the product will provide. As with fill power grades, lower tog ratings indicate a less insulating insert, and higher ratings indicate the opposite.

The stitching and construction of an insert play a significant role in how the blanket holds and distributes heat. Baffle-style seams work to keep filling arranged evenly across the insert, helping it hold its warmth while curbing the formation of cooler areas that can result from shifting filling. Channel stitching, on the other hand, is perfect for individuals seeking an option that isn't quite so insulating.

When it comes to shell material, natural fibers like cotton tend to be softest. Cotton is a tough fiber that stands up well to night after night of use. If you're a fan of luxury, go for a silk shell to achieve a stylish look without sacrificing coziness.

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Gia Vescovi-Chiordi
Last updated on November 17, 2019 by Gia Vescovi-Chiordi

Born in Arizona, Gia is a writer and autodidact who fled the heat of the desert for California, where she enjoys drinking beer, overanalyzing the minutiae of life, and channeling Rick Steves. After arriving in Los Angeles a decade ago, she quickly nabbed a copywriting job at a major clothing company and derived years of editing and proofreading experience from her tenure there, all while sharpening her skills further with myriad freelance projects. In her spare time, she teaches herself French and Italian, has earned an ESL teaching certificate, traveled extensively throughout Europe and the United States, and unashamedly devours television shows and books. The result of these pursuits is expertise in fashion, travel, beauty, literature, textbooks, and pop culture, in addition to whatever obsession consumes her next.


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