Updated April 29, 2019 by Quincy Miller

The 10 Best Electric Broadcast Spreaders

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This wiki has been updated 5 times since it was first published in December of 2018. You can plant a field, fertilize existing crops, or clear off icy roads in a hurry with one of these electric broadcast spreaders. Their motors disperse your material of choice in an even and steady manner, allowing you to get the job done efficiently. We've included options that mount to trucks, ATVs and lawnmowers, and even one you can carry around in the palm of your hand. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best electric broadcast spreader on Amazon.

10. Fimco ATV-DMS

9. Field Tuff AS-12V

8. SaltDogg TGS05B

7. Scotts Wizz

6. Buyers Products ATVS100

5. SaltDogg TGS06

4. JRCO 504

3. SaltDogg TGS07

2. Spyker S80-12010

1. SaltDogg SHPE0750

Editor's Notes

April 26, 2019:

Most of the options here are designed for large-scale or commercial use. However, there are quite a few that will be suitable for smaller jobs, like the Field Tuff AS-12V, or even the Scotts Wizz, which is perfect for suburban homeowners.

Many also require a specialized vehicle to operate; some need a pickup truck, as is the case with most of the SaltDogg models listed here, while others only work with ATVs, like the Fimco ATV-DMS. Obviously, having the proper machine is important, so make sure the model you're exploring is compatible with the vehicles you have on hand, unless you want this to get very expensive very quickly.

Also, check to see that whatever device you're considering will be suitable with the material you're hoping to disperse. The SaltDogg TGS05B, for example, only uses bagged salt, so it might not be ideal for municipal projects requiring large quantities of bulk salt. Others do well with smaller materials like seeds yet bog down with heavier substances like lime. You'll pay more for added versatility, but then again, there's no point in paying anything for a machine that won't do what you need it to do.


Quincy Miller
Last updated on April 29, 2019 by Quincy Miller

After getting his bachelor’s from the University of Texas, Quincy Miller moved out to Los Angeles, where he soon found work as a copywriter and researcher, specializing in health and wellness topics for a major online media brand. Quincy is also knowledgeable about home improvement, as he’s had extensive experience with everything from insulation to power tools to emergency room trips, sometimes in that order. Sharing a home with three dogs and a couple of cats has forced Quincy to learn as much as he can about pet supplies, animal nutrition and, most importantly, the best ways to tackle the mountains of fur that accumulate in every corner of your home.


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