The 10 Best Electric Food Slicers

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This wiki has been updated 24 times since it was first published in April of 2015. Both an art and a craft, cooking starts with accurate knife technique — and nothing is as reliable as a machine when it comes to consistent cuts. So whether you have one or one dozen people hungry for dinner, an electric food slicer can make your meal prep easier than you've ever imagined. Just make certain to exercise plenty of caution when using sharp kitchen tools, especially electric ones. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best electric food slicer on Amazon.

10. Chef's Choice 615

9. Cuisinart FS-75

8. Hobart HS9

7. Cuisinart Electric Knife

6. Robot Coupe Food Processor

5. Presto Salad Shooter Professional

4. KitchenWare Station MS-10NT

3. Hobart Edge 12

2. Berkel 827E Plus

1. Beswood 250

Special Honors

Hobart Slicers This manufacturer is so ubiquitous in professional kitchens that cooks tend to refer to some of their many appliances as "the Hobart," so it's no surprise that their slicers are of high quality. On their website you'll find not only a long list of their offerings, but also a comprehensive selection of the highly convenient attachments that work with them. hobartcorp.com

Avantco Equipment If you're looking for professional quality but can't afford to make a massive investment, this company should be on your list. They make high-quality appliances that are fully NSF certified, work well for years, and don't break the bank. avantcoequipment.com

Globe Food Equipment If you are willing to drop a considerable amount of money, Globe would be a good choice to start looking for a slicer. They're among the most expensive providers, but they also make some of the longest lasting and most effective machines on the market. globefoodequip.com

Editor's Notes

April 17, 2020:

There are a few routes you can take when looking for an electric food slicer. If you really don't want to spend much but you do want to slice meat, the Chef's Choice 615 and Cuisinart FS-75 may work for you, but you do need to be aware that while they're shaped a bit like one, they're not anything like a commercial slicer. If you operate them with care and have realistic expectations, though, they can work, although they can't work for more than 10 minutes at a time.

A better idea for most home users would be to invest a bit more in either the KitchenWare Station MS-10NT, which has a 320-watt motor, or the Beswood 250, with a 240-watt motor. While the Beswood isn't quite as powerful, it is a little easier to take apart and clean. These two both effectively emulate commercial slicers to the point that most consumers will be very impressed with their performance.

Then there are the actual commercial meat slicers. These bad boys are expensive, and with the possible exception of the Berkel 827E Plus, which is actually a fantastic deal, they're generally too expensive for most home users and frequently seen only in professional kitchens. The Hobart Edge 12 is one of the most common and the Hobart HS9 one of the most capable. For more high-end commercial models, see our Special Honors section.

There are additional electric appliances that can slice food, although they generally serve very different purposes than tabletop meat slicers. The Cuisinart Electric Knife is excellent for carving large birds and roasts and it's basically a matter of preference if you'd rather have a conventional or electric carving knife. The Presto Salad Shooter Professional can also greatly reduce prep time for a large number of dishes. We've also highlighted the Robot Coupe Food Processor, which is one of the most durable and versatile implements found in restaurant kitchens around the world.

As two final notes, if you do decide on a tabletop meat slicer, it's a very good idea to also pick up a chain cut-proof glove, because even the low-powered slicers can be very dangerous. Also, while electric appliances can be handy, you'll likely need a good chef's knife on hand no matter what.

A Different Kind Of Knife

A sharp piece of steel can work wonders in the hands of a talented chef.

Everybody knows that knives rule the kitchen. A sharp piece of steel can work wonders in the hands of a talented chef. Whether you're slicing, dicing, or filleting, there's a nearly endless list of applications for quality blades in any culinary institution.

But it's simply not ideal to perform some tasks by hand. Three-millimeter slices of roasted turkey breast and dill havarti cheese are pretty difficult to make with a knife. Ten pounds of hangar steak won't turn itself into crispy beef strips. And there's no easy way to craft delicious, paper-thin beef carpaccio using elbow grease and hand tools. For these situations and more, many great chefs turn to a blade of the rotating variety — that is to say, the electric slicer.

Perched on the counter of any sandwich shop worth its salt, you'll see a large, silver-colored behemoth that sees more action than almost any other tool. The deli slicer is ubiquitous in open kitchens across the country, and it often dwarfs most of the other machinery nearby. Cooks treat it with an incredible amount of respect, and for good reason; the electric slicer is one of the strongest and most intimidating tools in the kitchen. But it's also among the most effective solutions for a number of tasks, and any established sandwich-maker will be intimately familiar with its use.

Not Just For Delis Any Longer

So there's a great, big machine with a razor-sharp blade that spins at thousands of rpm, and it seems to belong in professional kitchens. A lot of home chefs might balk at the difficulty of maintaining such a significant piece of equipment. But even the most talented chef today once got their start by cooking in their kitchen at home. There's no reason that any home chef can't safely and effectively use a tool like this. Of course, not every home needs a 12" rotary-bladed monstrosity taking up a ton of space on the kitchen counter. Luckily, there are a lot of options available today that make this great tool accessible to many home chefs who are dying to hone their craft.

In fact, the blossoming market means that even restaurants have a greater range of choices when it comes to purchasing their perfect slicer.

And it's really a good thing that everyone wants to be a chef these days. So many people are learning how to make delicious, gourmet cuisine, and the availability of tools like slicers makes it that much more realistic to craft professional-quality meals at home. In fact, the blossoming market means that even restaurants have a greater range of choices when it comes to purchasing their perfect slicer. There's some overlap now; it's not difficult to find a seriously high-quality deli slicer that fits easily in your kitchen and is easy to clean and keep up.

So, it's worth looking into one of these units for yourself. Yes, they rotate quickly, and it wouldn't be difficult to lose a fingertip without the proper care. But these slicers are made to be used safely; they feature easily-operated on/off switches, and many of them use reliable guards to hold the food as you slice it. Additionally, there are chain gloves available from some companies that will protect your hands even if they should slip while you shave a block of cheese.

When it comes to the safe and easy use of a rotating knife, cleanliness is of utmost importance. Having a clean, sharp blade edge, as well as smooth joints and easily-adjusted knobs makes all the difference when trying to keep your hands in one piece while processing food with one of these machines. Make sure to keep every piece of your electric slicer clean — wash everything with soap and water, as well as sanitizer after every use to keep debris, bacteria, and corrosion from taking hold of any parts or surfaces. This will ensure that your blade stays sharp for a long time, and the slicer itself operates smoothly and reliably for even longer.

Speaking of sharp blades, you'll find some slicer models that include sharpening or honing surfaces on the body of the unit. These can be effective, but every year or so it's a good idea to have a professional sharpener touch up a blade. In the event of major damage or significant wear to a blade, replacements are almost always readily available.

Slicing More Than Salami

Everybody likes a good cold-cut sandwich, and it's hard to get that perfect slice with a knife. When they need some shaved loaf, most chefs turn to electric slicers. But outside of shaving leaves of pastrami, what can these humming knives accomplish?

But outside of shaving leaves of pastrami, what can these humming knives accomplish?

Beef carpaccio is a classic dish that is made from raw beef. An entire, closely trimmed tenderloin is seared on all sides with salt and pepper, then sliced to a translucent thickness and served raw, sometimes alongside a lightly bitter green salad and a balsamic reduction. The meat absolutely melts in your mouth. The problem is, it's incredibly difficult to get a consistently thin-enough slice by hand. The solution: quickly freeze the freshly seared beef and make the paper-thin preparations on an electric slicer.

Have a few loaves of bread you need to separate evenly for some artisanal avocado toast? Throw 'em on the slicer. Need to shave some parmesan to garnish your gourmet macaroni and cheese? Simple, even with a smaller, home-oriented model. If you're trying to finely dice a few ounces of dried chorizo, one of these spinning knives is a great place to start, turning cured meat into thin slices ready for finishing with a knife. Onion slices for hamburger grillouts, aubergine fillets for eggplant parmesan, and of course, the ever-popular sandwich slices of meat and cheese are all now easy to create at home.

So, make sure you get the right size of slicer for your home or business, and keep it as clean as you possibly can.

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Christopher Thomas
Last updated on April 18, 2020 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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