The 10 Best Electric Meat Grinders

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We spent 27 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you plan on preparing a smorgasbord of meaty dishes for a crowd, or your family is just crazy for homemade sausages and hamburgers, one of these electric meat grinders will let you churn out expertly prepared mince without expending too much time or effort. We've included some of the best models for light, in-home use, as well as those suited to heavy-duty tasks in restaurant kitchens. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric meat grinder on Amazon.

10. Betitay Max

9. Ginatex 2000

8. HomeLeader Stuffer

7. Sunmile SM-G50

6. Altra MG090

5. HappyBuy 90800

4. Kitchener Cutter

3. Weston Pro Series

2. STX International Turboforce

1. LEM Big Bite

Editor's Notes

March 26, 2019:

There's no burger like a freshly ground burger. Not only is freshness the key to great-tasting meat, but having your own grinder gives you the freedom to use high-quality cuts of meat, rather than the mishmash of products that generally makes up pre-ground beef or frozen burgers. The Betitay, Ginatex, and HomeLeader are worthwhile choices if you only occasionally get the urge to craft your own burgers or sausages, but they aren't built to stand up to full-time use or chicken bones. The Altra serves a similar purpose, though it's a bit stronger and more costly. The Sunmile and Kitchener are both quite well-made, though if you're looking to spend around $200, you should strongly consider the STX Turboforce, which is an exceptional value, in light of its great performance. Anyone working in a restaurant kitchen who doesn't want to drop thousands on one of those massive and loud industrial machines is in luck, though, as the HappyBuy and Weston Pro are both great choices made of durable components. It is, however, hard to beat the LEM Big Bite, which comes in four different sizes, and can power through nearly any type of meat with great speed as well as ease.


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on March 27, 2019 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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