Updated July 26, 2019 by Daniel Goldstein

The 10 Best Flasks

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 22 times since it was first published in October of 2015. Apart from transporting booze conveniently, a flask may serve as a decorative ornament on a liquor cabinet and makes for a good gift for friends who enjoy a tipple. We're not here to judge or sermonize, but rather to help you find the best products available, though we advise anyone to always drink responsibly and within the limits of the law, and to never drive while drinking. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best flask on Amazon.

10. Vapur Incognito

9. GoPong Sunscreen

8. GSI Outdoors

7. Stanley Easy Fill

6. Cork Pops Nicholas Portside

5. Visol Edinburgh

4. Stanley Adventure

3. BarMe Shots on the Go

2. Primo Liquor Premium

1. Stanley Master Wide-Mouth

Special Honors

Jacob Bromwell's Great American Flask Boasting a stunning, solid-copper construction, this flask undergoes a labor-intensive process called hot-tinning, in which the copper interior is made safe for beverages by being dipped in molten tin by highly-skilled professionals. Copper is rust-proof and corrosion-resistant, so this one requires very little upkeep. However, if you don't treat the finish, over time, it will naturally lose its brilliant sheen as it naturally oxidizes. The upside is that this will result in a unique, potentially beautiful patina. The 9-ounce flask, which is handmade in the USA, is backed by a lifetime guarantee. jacobbromwell.com

Snow Peak Curved Due to its high-quality titanium build, this nearly indestructible flask only weighs 2.5 ounces. You can store liquor in it for a long period without worrying about the metal leaching into the liquid. Its slick, gorgeously-curved body can hold 6.4 ounces of booze, but its one major flaw is that the cap is pretty easy to lose — especially during a bout of drinking. snowpeak.com

Editor's Notes

July 19, 2019:

Whether you're looking for one flask to fool 'em all, or a beauty to wear proudly on your hip, we've tried to include a varied bunch that'll offer something to everyone. If you're looking for a traditional hip flask, you have a few options to pick from, each with its own appeal. The Primo Liquor Premium (#2), the Visol Edinburgh (#5), and the Cork Pops Nicholas Portside (#6) take the cake as far as stylishness is concerned.

Stanley, the industrial tools & household hardware company, happens to make rather well-made flasks that can take a beating, and for this reason we've included 3 of their products on our list. Outdoors enthusiasts and ham-handed klutzes alike will likely want to look towards the rugged Stanley Adventure (#4) or the Stanley Master Wide-Mouth (#1).

Finally, we included the BarMe Shots on the Go (#3) high on our list despite its rather standard build-quality. The reason we did this is because of its collapsible cup and included funnel, which make the flask-using experience much less messy. In fact, we were surprised that we didn't stumble upon more models that provided such convenience.

A Brief History Of Flasks

With the passage of the 21st Amendment in 1933, Prohibition ended and flasks stopped being a necessity for the prospective tippler.

The feeling of needing a good, stiff drink is a near-universal aspect of the human condition. Unfortunately, there are certain times when you really need some booze, but imbibing is frowned upon (like church services and kindergarten graduations). Luckily, for those times, we have flasks.

In the early 19th century, glass-blowing techniques had developed to the point that it was possible to design personal, curved containers that would fit neatly on the hip. These vessels were first used in Masonic lodges, which provided food and water, but were strictly BYOB. Since many Masons also owned glass-blowing facilities, it was natural that they'd figure out a convenient way to sneak whiskey into their monthly meetings.

During the Civil War, many soldiers kept flasks on their person at all times, both to deal with the horrors of battle and also to use as an anesthetic and antiseptic. The whiskey used at the time, called rotgut, was severe enough that a good firefight probably seemed less dreadful by comparison.

Flasks would enter into their heyday with the passage of Prohibition. In fact, the term bootlegging stems from the fact that many people kept flasks stashed in their boots in order to smuggle alcohol, while many women used their garters for the same purpose. Owning and carrying a flask became quite fashionable, a sign that you were rebellious enough to flout laws you considered unjust — and that you were probably pretty fun to party with, as well.

With the passage of the 21st Amendment in 1933, Prohibition ended and flasks stopped being a necessity for the prospective tippler. However, they kept their roguish associations, and were still popular with those looking to liven up dreary social events.

Today, flasks of all shapes, sizes, and materials can be found anywhere that the consumption of alcohol is frowned upon, or in those places where drinking can be prohibitively expensive. Flasks are used by those on all rungs of society, and are equally likely to be found tucked away inside a purse as they are nestled in the breast pocket of a sports coat.

After all, if there's one thing that unites us all, it's the need for a belt of Scotch to get through that meeting the boss has every Monday morning.

Picking The Right Flask

The type of flask you carry says a lot about you as a person. The biggest thing it says is that you might have a drinking problem, but beyond that, it gives clear indications about your priorities in life.

A glass flask won't taint the flavor of the spirits inside, but it's not suitable for rowdy events.

The first thing to consider is the type of material you want your flask to be made of, as they all have their pros and cons. A glass flask won't taint the flavor of the spirits inside, but it's not suitable for rowdy events. Pewter and plastic flasks are inexpensive, but they can affect the taste, as whiskey bonds to the container in which it's stored. Stainless steel is the most popular, as it's both durable and light on your pocketbook, and it can be engraved for an added touch of class.

The size and shape of the flask is also important to think about, as you want something that's easy to conceal but can contain enough booze to help you get to feeling good. Think about how you're going to get your hooch into the thing as well; many flasks come with funnels, while others have large enough mouths that you can pour your sauce directly inside. Also, if it's going to be pressed against your person, than a traditional curved hip flask will likely be more comfortable than one that's flat.

Of course, there's no reason why you can't invest in several options, and have a suitable choice for every occasion that might warrant secret drinking. Just be careful when showing off your flask collection, as owning one can be a surefire way to spur an intervention.

Tips For Surreptitious Sipping

Just because you own a flask doesn't mean you truly know how to use it. If you want to set yourself apart from the drunken frat boys and morose day-drinkers, you need to know how to wield your flask with style.

However, if you absolutely must pack a little firewater for that football game or school board meeting, realize that you're likely to be the only one with any alcohol on you.

Before we go any further, though, you should be aware that having a flask on you is still illegal in many places, as it's considered a violation of open container laws. You could potentially find yourself in hot water with the justice system as a result, especially if it's discovered in your car, so take that into consideration before you begin to carry any pocket potables with you.

Also, keep in mind that the flask was originally intended for you to drink just enough to take the edge off, not to get sloppy drunk. While that can obviously change based on the situation and your intentions, take into consideration your company before deciding to tie one on. There's a reason why drinking is frowned upon in certain situations, after all.

However, if you absolutely must pack a little firewater for that football game or school board meeting, realize that you're likely to be the only one with any alcohol on you. If you think that your company would enjoy a little nip as well, be sure to offer. It's rude to only think about your own needs — but it's potentially dicey to offer the wrong person a swallow, so use your judgment accordingly.

If you're sharing it, though — and even if you're not — please wash it. Bacteria loves stainless steel, and other materials aren't much better, so sterilizing it as best you can after every use is essential. A little soap and warm water should do the trick.

Once you get a handle on how to carry a flask, don't be surprised if others want to follow in your footsteps. There's a reason why they're so popular as groomsmen gifts, you know.

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Daniel Goldstein
Last updated on July 26, 2019 by Daniel Goldstein

Daniel is a writer, musician, and frequent traveler with a bachelor’s in creative writing from the State University of New York. In recent years, his writing chops have developed alongside his musical skills, thanks to a rich double life. During the day, he apprenticed with “Rolling Stone” journalist and critic Will Hermes, and when the sun set, he and his NYC-based, four-piece band gigged at high-end venues across the northeastern United States. His affinity for sharing things he's passionate about has culminated in nine years of experience as a music teacher at elementary schools, where he honed his ability to simplify and elucidate concepts to the uninitiated. All considered, he feels most at home writing about instruments, audio electronics and backpacking gear.


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