The 8 Best Kid's Trampolines

Updated November 02, 2017 by Daniel Imperiale

8 Best Kid's Trampolines
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We spent 42 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. Before your kids get too old, you may want to try and embed a love of exercise in them with one of these kids' trampolines. That way, they might not immediately veg out in front of the TV or their video games and smartphones as soon as they enter those volatile 'tween years. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best kid's trampoline on Amazon.

8. JumpSport iBounce 2

The JumpSport iBounce 2 is more than strong enough for even the most rambunctious of children. It can support jumpers weighing up to 150 pounds, so it could moonlight as an adult's exercise tool. It won the 2014 Creative Child Awards "Product of the Year."
  • folds up when not in use
  • comes with a hop-a-long rompyroo dvd
  • paint tends to chip easily
Brand JumpSport
Model RBJ-S-20856-02
Weight 17.1 pounds
Rating 4.0 / 5.0

7. Diggin JumpSmart 10050

The Diggin JumpSmart 10050 features multiple songs and sound effects games that your young children will love and that will help keep them engaged for hours on end. Just know that these very same sounds drive many parents and older siblings nuts.
  • ok for outdoor use in good weather
  • stable handlebar design
  • assembly is annoying
Brand Diggin
Model 10050
Weight 16.2 pounds
Rating 4.0 / 5.0

6. Kangaroo 36-Inch Indoor

Your kids will likely outgrow the Kangaroo 36-Inch Indoor before they hit grade school, but between those toddler and elementary school years, this compact, solid trampoline will be a favorite for indoor play. It can handle years of daily use without failure.
  • handle is easy to install
  • comes with a 6-month warranty
  • slightly overpriced option
Brand Kangaroo
Model KM-10104-2500
Weight 16.2 pounds
Rating 4.3 / 5.0

5. Original Toy Company Fold & Go

While the Original Toy Company Fold & Go seems rather simple to put together and take apart, it's important to remember that it's designed not just for easy assembly, but for durability, as well, so that uncomplicated setup still takes a fair amount of time.
  • circular safety pad
  • rated for 150 lbs
  • elastic ties are a choking hazard
Brand The Original Toy Compan
Model 59609
Weight 17.9 pounds
Rating 4.5 / 5.0

4. Skywalker Round Seaside Adventure

The Skywalker Round Seaside Adventure is a great price for a well-made, stable bouncer that comes complete with a safety enclosure. It is recommended for kids between the ages of three and seven, but can support jumpers weighing as much as 100 lbs.
  • stretch bands prevent spring pinches
  • wide-frame base
  • net is prone to tearing
Brand Skywalker
Model SBT60
Weight 27.3 pounds
Rating 4.4 / 5.0

3. Little Tikes 3-Foot

Don't let a rainy or wintry day ruin the family fun; just get out the Little Tikes 3-Foot and let your children bounce the day away, getting exercise, burning off energy, and generally having a great time with this classic, affordable option.
  • good price for good quality
  • feet will not damage flooring
  • for indoor use only
Brand Little Tikes
Model 630354M
Weight 15.1 pounds
Rating 4.7 / 5.0

2. Pure Fun Kids Preschool Jumper

The square shape of the Pure Fun Kids Preschool Jumper maximizes space for bouncing, while its wide, sturdy handlebar enhances safety and makes it easy to enjoy, even when a youngster hasn't yet mastered the finer points of balance.
  • bright letters adorn exterior
  • 30 covered springs
  • great reviews from parents
Brand Pure Fun
Model 9007PJ
Weight 23.1 pounds
Rating 4.5 / 5.0

1. SkyBound Super 7

The SkyBound Super 7 can accommodate jumpers weighing up to 110 pounds, so your kids ought to enjoy it for years to come. Its padded steel tube frame is both safe and durable, and its zinc-plated springs endure bounce after bounce.
  • permatron jumping mat
  • easy step-by-step setup
  • 2-year warranty
Brand SkyBound
Model T0-0880211123
Weight 52 pounds
Rating 4.8 / 5.0

How To Choose The Right Trampoline

If you've got a wriggly little jumping bean at home, you've probably considered getting a trampoline at least once. When you picture the typical trampoline, you may think you need to be blessed with a spacious backyard and a large disposable income to accommodate one of those giant contraptions, but trampolines actually come in a variety of sizes to fit any space and budget.

Regardless of the amount of space you may or may not have available, you'll also want to consider the primary purpose of your trampoline before choosing a style and size. Do you have a young gymnast in training, or are you searching for a way to get a couch potato moving? Will only small children play on it, or do you plan to use it to change up your workout occasionally?

For children under the age of six, some smaller trampolines can be used indoors during the cold winter months. This is ideal for an age group that seems to possess an endless supply of energy. Look for a model with rubberized feet designed to protect your floors. Another reason to go with a more compact trampoline is that they often come with a handlebar so that younger jumpers can keep their balance while developing better coordination.

For older, more experienced jumpers, a larger unit that allows them to jump higher makes sense. Only consider a model that comes with a safety net enclosure and covered springs. Having an outdoor trampoline for older children also gives them an extra incentive to spend some time outdoors at an age when they often begin spending too much time inside.

Trampoline Safety Tips

You would be hard-pressed to find a medical association that expressly approves the usage of trampolines, but many parents see them as an essential outlet for their high-energy, rambunctious youngsters. Because of this, you can find expert safety guidelines from organizations like the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, to help keep your children safe on a trampoline.

Adult supervision is probably the single most important safety measure. When you are considering your purchase of a trampoline, keep in mind that your child's trampoline time is not going to be your window for making dinner or getting chores done around the house. As you supervise this activity, consider it a smart investment in ensuring you have a properly tuckered out child at bedtime later that evening. Parents also need to enforce a strict “no somersault” rule. These high-risk tricks should only be attempted with the help of professional instructors.

Most experts agree that children under the age of six should not jump on the large, full-size trampolines. Regardless of age, only one jumper at a time should occupy the trampoline; otherwise, the smaller participant is far more likely to become injured. You should also never leave a ladder near an outdoor trampoline to protect small children or neighbors from climbing in and jumping unsupervised.

Proper installation and maintenance will also go a long way towards keeping your little jumpers safe. Trampolines should always sit on a solid, level surface. Caregivers should inspect equipment on a regular basis for worn or damaged parts. It's a good idea to invest in a quality trampoline that includes protective padding around all metal springs and hooks, or purchase shock-absorbing pads for any exposed parts. While you might spend a little more upfront, you'll save a bundle compared to a trip to the emergency room.

A Brief History Of The Trampoline

While the trampoline is a relatively modern invention, there are some historical trampoline-esque activities that serve as a percursor to its development. For hundreds of years, the Inuit people of Alaska have used a walrus skin, held taut by multiple people to toss blanket dancers in the air as part of their whale harvest celebrations. There is some evidence this action was also used as way to spot animals off at a distance when hunting.

The first trampoline as we know it today was built in 1934 by gymnastics competitors George Nissen and Larry Griswold to assist their team in training to do somersaults, back flips and other tricks. Both were students at the University of Iowa at the time. Their creation was inspired by the tight nets trapeze artists used during their circus performances. They constructed it in the basement of a local YMCA using angle iron, a canvas bed and rubber springs, painstakingly threading the nets by hand.

Nissen and Griswold discovered their invention might have mass appeal when they moved the trampoline to a nearby YMCA camp. The young campers loved bouncing on it and often begged them to play on it. In 1942, they formed a company and began manufacturing trampolines for recreational and home usage. By the late 1950s, trampolining became so popular that recreational jump centers sprung up around the country, often at odd places like gas stations. These places lacked proper padding and safety measures, so they soon fell out of favor.

The trampoline has been used in some unconventional ways to train pilots and astronauts. It was used to train fighter pilots as early as World War II. It was discovered that trampolines could be used to help pilots reorient themselves after revolving in space and desensitize them to rapid twists and turns they would experience in battle. It also serves as a superior form of cardio conditioning over the basic treadmill. Early astronauts also benefited from this kind of training, as they were able to momentarily simulate the feeling of weightlessness.

The sport of competitive trampolining began in American universities in the 1950s, but enthusiasm for the sport quickly spread throughout the world. The first world championship was held in London in 1973. By the year 2000, the sport had enough widespread popularity to make its debut at the Sydney Olympic Games, with both women's and men's events.



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Last updated on November 02, 2017 by Daniel Imperiale

Daniel is a writer, actor, and director living in Los Angeles, CA. He spent a large portion of his 20s roaming the country in search of new experiences, taking on odd jobs in the strangest places, studying at incredible schools, and making art with empathy and curiosity.


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