Updated April 04, 2019 by Melissa Harr

The 10 Best Korean Grill Pans

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Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 15 times since it was first published in January of 2017. If you regularly find yourself craving perfect pork belly served with a side of kimchi, there's no need to travel overseas or even to a restaurant down the street. Just get yourself a proper Korean grill pan and prepare all your favorite meals at home. We only included those that offer a hassle-free barbecue experience with reliable grease drainage, in both electric and non-electric versions. When users buy our independently chosen editorial selections, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best korean grill pan on Amazon.

10. Baroget Portable

9. Maple Suki BBQ/Hot Pot

8. WaxonWare Black

7. Dongwoo BBQ Stone

6. CookKing Traditional

5. Zojirushi Indoor

4. Alpha Living 50440

3. Happycall Stove Top

2. CookKing Master

1. TeChef Stovetop

Editor's Notes

April 03, 2019:

Instead of limiting ourselves, we decided to add several variations of Korean grill pans in order to satisfy the wide variety of chefs out there. That means we looked at models that use water, those that do not, and electric offerings. Out of all of these, it's still tough to beat the TeChef Stovetop, which is non-stick but safe, eye-catching, and easy to use. The CookKing Master is similar, but it has channels for small pieces or liquids — a double-edged sword, since it's convenient but also just a bit harder to clean. When it comes to models that use water, we think the WaxonWare Black is a fine choice, although it's a little pricey for the overall construction, and you shouldn't expect any bells and whistles. And speaking of more feature-laden models, we added the Zojirushi Indoor Grill and the Maple Suki BBQ/Hot Pot. They'll help you whip up some Korean barbecue and so much more, bringing all types of Asian cuisine into your home. This also means they're a bit more expensive, but if you reach for this type of cookware often and have the storage space, they may well be worth it.


Melissa Harr
Last updated on April 04, 2019 by Melissa Harr

Melissa Harr is a language-obsessed writer from Chicagoland who holds both a bachelor of arts and master of arts in English. Although she began as a TEFL teacher, earning several teaching certificates and working in both Russia and Vietnam, she moved into freelance writing to satisfy her passion for the written word. She has published full-length courses and books in the realm of arts & crafts and DIY; in fact, most of her non-working time is spent knitting, cleaning, or committing acts of home improvement. Along with an extensive knowledge of tools, home goods, and crafts and organizational supplies, she has ample experience (okay, an obsession) with travel gear, luggage, and the electronics that make modern life more convenient.


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