6 Organizations Promoting the Arts in New York City

Though New York is home to incredible museums featuring famous artists, you don't have to be a big name to do important work. These organizations work in different parts of the city to nurture talent and bring exceptional work to areas that are often neglected, ensuring that everyone can experience the possibilities of inspired creativity. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

6 Prominent New York Arts Organizations

Name Purpose
Harvestworks Brings together practitioners from different artistic forms in an effort to promote the use of electronic media through educational programs, the Technology, Engineering, Art, and Music Lab, and the Workspace Residency Program
Bronx River Art Center Provides a multicultural forum where artists, young people, and members of the community can channel their creativity into expressive output and participate in the revitalization and ongoing development of their neighborhoods
Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance Facilitates the creation of new works by both emerging and established artists, encourages public engagement around issues that affect upper Manhattan’s cultural community, and fosters the region’s economic development and overall vibrancy
No Longer Empty Curates site-responsive exhibitions, education and public programs in unconventional locations around the city, providing platforms for collaboration and dialogue around social, cultural and political issues
More Art Supports collaborations between professional artists and communities to create public art and educational programs that inspire social justice
Bronx Council on the Arts Promotes cultural equity by nurturing a diverse array of artists and organizations in the Bronx, placing a particular emphasis on helping underrepresented groups

Get To Know Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center

The Value Of The Arts In New York's Economy

According to data released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the National Endowment for the Arts, arts and cultural productions accounted for 7.8% of the total gross state product in New York in 2016. The table below compares the value added to the economy by arts to the value added by other sectors.

Sector Value Added
Arts & Cultural Production $119,856,783,000
Retail $69,957,400,000
Construction $46,845,800,000
Education Services $33,821,600,000
Transportation $30,966,900,000
Utilities $21,117,900,000
Agriculture & Forestry $2,394,000,000
Mining $828,100,000

No Longer Empty's Programs for Teens

Arts Education in America

In Depth

As one of the most vibrant, creative cities on earth, the Big Apple practically oozes artistic energy. Boasting world-class galleries, theaters, and musical venues, it has a little something for everyone. While so much of its impressive cultural offerings sometimes seem to grow organically, in reality there are a ton of groups dedicated to keeping the city's attractions top-notch. If you are interested in learning more about their work, then here are, in no particular order, six organizations nurturing New York City's artistic side.

Coming in at #1 is Harvestworks. Established in 1977, this not-for-profit organization helps artists create works that incorporate new and developing technologies; it brings together practitioners from different fields of the arts, in an effort to promote the use of electronic media. Located in Lower Manhattan, Harvestworks offers one-on-one tutorials in a variety of subjects and independent study and certificate programs.

At the core of its work is the Technology, Engineering, Art, and Music Lab, which allows artists to explore and experiment with different styles of art and presentation. In addition, it runs its own Workspace Residency Program, which provides artists and professionals in the field of digital media access to the organization's studios. If you are interested in showing your support for Harvestworks, you can make a donation online or attend one of its upcoming events, which often showcase its exciting projects.

At the core of its work is the Technology, Engineering, Art, and Music Lab, which allows artists to explore and experiment with different styles of art and presentation.

In the #2 spot is Bronx River Art Center. Founded in 1987 as a community arts program, this nonprofit seeks to inspire local residents to participate in the revitalization and ongoing development of their neighborhoods. An official member of the Bronx River Alliance, BRAC serves as a multicultural forum where artists, young people, and members of the community can channel their creativity into expressive output.

With a LEED-certified building of 18,000 square feet, BRAC runs a number of programs and initiatives for its visitors. In the educational realm, it hosts classes for children covering topics such as cartooning and digital animation. Adults, meanwhile, can join in on the fun as well, studying subjects like ceramics and digital photography. Studio space is also available, for up to two years, at reasonable rates for working artists. Those who wish to get involved with Bronx River Art Center can attend an exhibition at its gallery or make a tax-deductible gift.

At #3 is the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance. Founded in 2007, this nonprofit is an arts service organization that fosters and encourages the works of individuals and groups active in the neighborhoods of Northern Manhattan. In support of its mission, NoMAA pursues a variety of pathways, collaborating with new and established artists, promoting discussion and engagement with cultural topics impacting the area, and supporting the region's economic development.

In support of its mission, NoMAA pursues a variety of pathways, collaborating with new and established artists, promoting discussion and engagement with cultural topics impacting the area, and supporting the region's economic development.

To advance creative expression, NoMAA has partnered with numerous community organizations, including Musicians for Musicians, Organic Magnetics, and People's Theatre Project. Each year, it presents the Uptown Arts Stroll, which features artists' works and community attractions in Washington Heights, Inwood, and West Harlem. If you want to lend a helping hand to NoMAA, consider signing up to become a member.

Coming in at #4 is No Longer Empty. Emphasizing community engagement, NLE puts on exhibitions, education opportunities, and programs that are free and accessible to the public. Through a process of collaboration, No Longer Empty brings together residents, curators, and artists as it creates programming in unique spaces that aims to spark discussions on location, identity, and views of the future.

An example of a past exhibition is "Hold These Truths," a collection of works that grappled with the history of justice and the divisiveness of our political landscape, among other topics. Furthermore, No Longer Empty runs a number of other initiatives, such as the NLE Curatorial Lab, a space for experimentation and professional development, and Young Exhibition Makers, a paid training program for local high school students. Those who are interested in supporting No Longer Empty can make donations online or look into ways to share their time with the group.

Furthermore, No Longer Empty runs a number of other initiatives, such as the NLE Curatorial Lab, a space for experimentation and professional development, and Young Exhibition Makers, a paid training program for local high school students.

In the #5 spot is More Art. Formed in 2004, this organization began its work in Chelsea, seeking to produce projects that illuminate the concerns and challenges facing the city's communities. Since then, it has continued its work in different neighborhoods, endeavoring to create stimulating public art and educational programs. To further its aims, it has committed itself to the following set of core principles: quality, social engagement, collaboration, accessibility, and relevance.

Each year, More Art creates six educational programs on average, In addition, it sponsors a two-tiered fellowship and residency program called Engaging Artists. Elsewhere, it stays active and engaged with several important community topics, striving to ensure that its programs address issues such as homelessness, gentrification, and immigration. If you are interested in getting involved with this nonprofit, you can check out its blog or purchase items from its online shop.

Last but not least, at #6 is the Bronx Council on the Arts. Founded in 1962, BCA is committed to promoting cultural equity in the area. As the first organization in the Bronx to highlight both its work with artists and the community, BCA places a particular emphasis on helping underrepresented groups. Each year, it provides direct services to more than 1,000 artists and 250 arts groups.

Founded in 1962, BCA is committed to promoting cultural equity in the area.

Specific examples of BCA's programs and initiatives include SU-CASA, which seeks to enrich the experiences of seniors through arts education, and the Bronx Memoir Project, which offers free life writing workshops for professional and aspiring writers. Elsewhere, it offers funding in the form of grants for local arts and cultural projects. If you want to show your support for the Bronx Council on the Arts, you can attend one of its many events or inquire about volunteering and internship opportunities.