12 Wildly Creative and Humorous Novels

A good book can deeply affect readers, whether it's sad, inspirational, or full of sound advice. Some books can even make you laugh out loud in the middle of a train ride. If you're looking for a hilarious book full of unique stories and fascinating characters, check out the twelve novels listed here. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Books With a Good Sense of Humor: Our 12 Picks

Title Author
1. Commonwealth Joey Goebel
2. Less Than Hero S.G. Browne
3. Crap Kingdom D.C. Pierson
4. Dial M For Merde Stephen Clarke
5. The Glitch Elisabeth Cohen
6. Things Grak Hates Peter J. Story
7. Cash Out Greg Bardsley
8. Nose Down, Eyes Up Merrill Markoe
9. The Order of Odd-Fish James Kennedy
10. Go, Mutants! Larry Doyle
11. Unexpecting Lori Verni-Fogarsi
12. One Seriously Messed-Up Week Tom Clempson

8 Great Comedic Films:

  1. Airplane! (1980)
  2. Young Frankenstein (1974)
  3. Mean Girls (2004)
  4. Ghostbusters (1984)
  5. Legally Blonde (2001)
  6. The Big Lebowski (1998)
  7. Men in Black (1997)
  8. The Jerk (1979)

Why Do We Laugh?

In Depth

It's a rare author who can present reality in a way we've never seen before, and even rarer to make readers laugh in the process. These clever titles manage to shock, surprise, and enlighten in completely unexpected ways. Here, in no particular order, are 12 tales that will make you laugh, make you think, and make the world seem a little more interesting.

At #1 we have "Commonwealth," by Joey Goebel. Blue Gene Mapother is an average American, and the only thing he likes better than wrestling is his country. But Blue Gene's family is actually one of the wealthiest in America, and his mother wants great things for her eldest son, John. When his brother embarks on a congressional bid, Blue Gene must help him get back in touch with the average citizen or risk capsizing his political career. This witty and wacky story takes a clear-eyed look at class differences in America.

At #2 is S.G. Browne's "Less Than Hero." Lloyd Prescott has made a career out of being a test subject. After years of serving as a guinea pig for experimental pharmaceuticals, he's used to a few unexpected side effects. When he discovers that he can project the more damaging of his ailments onto other people, he embarks on a campaign to clean up the streets. Using their new abilities, Lloyd and his fellow guinea pigs fight crime in New York, including a new menace who may have a gift similar to their own.

Lloyd Prescott has made a career out of being a test subject.

Coming in at #3 is D.C. Pierson's "Crap Kingdom." When Tom Parking is summoned from his normal life to be the chosen savior of a magical kingdom, he assumes it's going to be great. Unfortunately, the kingdom he has to save is made of garbage, with a princess who has a fondness for fake mustaches. He decides to say no to being the chosen one, and is immediately replaced by his best friend Kyle, who has always been better than Tom at everything. Now Tom must try to take back his destiny and save his Crap Kingdom.

At #4 we have Stephen Clarke's "Dial M for Merde." Englishman Paul West is on the French coast, catering for his friend Elodie's wedding to an aristocrat. Initially, running into a gorgeous blonde named M who he met in Las Vegas seems like a lucky coincidence, but it soon becomes clear that there's more to M than meets the eye. Paul finds himself embroiled in a bizarre caviar-smuggling plot in the fourth entry of this popular series.

#5 is "The Glitch" by Elisabeth Cohen. Shelley Stone is the successful owner of a company named Conch, which makes an in-ear advice dispenser. Her life is hectic, to say the least, filled with 2 AM conference calls and standing naps in store lines. When she meets a woman who claims to be a younger version of herself, Shelley wonders if the pressure has finally become too much, but something much stranger may actually be afoot.

Shelley Stone is the successful owner of a company named Conch, which makes an in-ear advice dispenser.

At #6 we have Peter J. Story's "Things Grak Hates." Grak is a prehistoric tribesman, and he is sick and tired of most things in life, especially olives. He sets out on a mission: to rid the world of olives, once and for all, regardless of his fellow tribe members' bewilderment. Despite its strange beginnings, Grak's quest unlocks a dark and dangerous side of his personality, and he finds that power, once tasted, is very hard to give up.

Coming in at #7 is Greg Bardsley's "Cash Out." Dan Jordan, a Silicon Valley speechwriter, has just days to go before he can cash out his $1.1 million worth of stock in a tech company. Nothing in life is simple, however, and as Dan is leaving his vasectomy appointment, he is kidnapped by three villainous IT experts. Now Dan must escape from an increasingly absurd assortment of criminals and businessmen, all of them on the hunt for his money, just to make it out alive.

At #8, we have "Nose Down, Eyes Up" by Merrill Markoe. When Gil finds his dog Jimmy giving lessons in how to manipulate humans to the neighborhood canines, his first thought is of making a profit off his talking pet. Jimmy himself has other plans. He's figured out that Gil isn't his real dad, and now he wants to meet his birth mother. The only problem is that she's in Florida, living with Gil's ex-wife.

He's figured out that Gil isn't his real dad, and now he wants to meet his birth mother.

Taking the #9 spot is James Kennedy's "The Order of Odd-Fish." Thirteen-year-old Jo was dropped on her Aunt Lily's doorstep as a baby, with an anonymous note describing her as "dangerous." Now, at Lily's annual costume party, the pair are drawn from their California home and into the magical and strange world of Eldritch City, where they encounter the mysterious Order of Odd-Fish, who may hold the secret to Jo's true identity. This inventive young adult fantasy title is suitable for younger readers.

At #10 is Larry Doyle's "Go, Mutants!" A blend of teen drama and science fiction with hilarious results, this novel takes place in a world where classic movie aliens have integrated into human society. The story follows a teen extraterrestrial in love with the daughter of a mad scientist. Together with his equally bizarre friends, he must face not just the dangers of life as an alien on Earth, but the more mundane struggle of being a kid who simply doesn't fit in.

Coming in at #11, we have "Unexpecting" by Lori Verni-Fogarsi. Just as Shelley and David are preparing to see their daughter off to college, a surprise arrives on their doorstep: a pregnant seventeen-year-old named Alexandra, claiming that she's their other, long-lost daughter. Welcoming Alexandra into the household may be a bit of a challenge, as her erratic behavior and clashes with her sister lead to strife, and Shelley must try to keep the peace as her family hurtles towards disaster.

Welcoming Alexandra into the household may be a bit of a challenge, as her erratic behavior and clashes with her sister lead to strife, and Shelley must try to keep the peace as her family hurtles towards disaster.

Finally, in the #12 spot, we have "One Seriously Messed-Up Week in the Otherwise Mundane and Uneventful Life of Jack Samsonite" by Tom Clempson. Written in journal format, this book follows wickedly funny and irreverent teenager Jack Samsonite as he struggles to pass his exams, get his crush to notice him, and make it through the week without being beaten up. Jack deals with the drama of teenage life with wit, insight, and down-to-earth charm.