Updated June 04, 2020 by Brett Dvoretz

The 10 Best Gluten-free Flours

video play icon 10 Best Gluten-free Flours
Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive

This wiki has been updated 11 times since it was first published in May of 2018. If you want or need to switch to a wheat-free diet — whether because you have celiac disease or a severe sensitivity — you've probably realized that store-bought, premade items that suit your needs are expensive, and oftentimes not even that good. That's why we rounded up some quality gluten-free flour. With these, you can make all your favorite foods affordably at home. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best gluten-free flour on Amazon.

10. Otto's Naturals Cassava

9. Nutiva Organic Coconut

8. Bob's Red Mill Garbanzo Bean

7. Cup4Cup Wholesome

6. King Arthur All-Purpose

5. Premium Gold Flax And Ancient Grains

4. Gold Mine Masa Harina

3. Anthony's Fine Brown Rice

2. gfJules All-Purpose

1. Arrowhead Mills Millet

Special Honors

Moon Rabbit Foods Premium Cassava Working just as well as a coating for frying foods, as it does for making bread and cakes, Moon Rabbit Premium Cassava is a versatile option. Unlike with some other gluten-free flours, baked goods made with this stuff won't come out dry and crumbly, and it provides the body with vitamin C, calcium, and iron. moonrabbitfoods.com

Grain Millers Oat Flour Grain Millers focuses on making high-quality foods from a single ingredient source, oats, and their oat flour is no exception. It comes in a a few varieties, including colloidal and low-viscosity, and is available in packages as small as one ounce, and large bags of 50 pounds and more. It's a good source of soluble fiber, phosphorus, and potassium. grainmillers.com

Editor's Notes

June 03, 2020:

If there is one challenge every person who goes gluten-free is familiar with, it is recreating their favorite baked goods with a flavor and consistency that matches the wheat-based varieties. Too often homemade creations will come out overly dense, dry, and crumbly, rather than moist and fluffy. Luckily, we have rounded up a nice variety of gluten-free flours that should be able to help you overcome that struggle.

For example, Arrowhead Mills Millet works especially well in sweet baked goods because it doesn't have any bitterness, and its texture makes it a very good choice for whole grain breads. Nutiva Organic Coconut is also a smart choice for sweet baked cakes and breads thanks to its natural flavor that gives most dishes a tropical twist. If you can't stand when your culinary creations come out too dry, you'll want to consider Otto's Naturals Cassava, which should allow your breads and cakes to come out just as moist as the traditional kind. All of the above are single-ingredient foods, too, so you can control every aspect of what goes into your diet.

When it comes to truly recreating the behavior of wheat flours in baking, oftentimes blends, like gfJules All-Purpose and King Arthur All-Purpose, can work better than single-ingredient flours, since they have been tested and formulated specifically for that purpose. Both of these make use of tapioca, potato, and various other starch sources. If you want a mixed flour that is higher in whole grains than the above two options, Premium Gold Flax And Ancient Grains is going to be a better choice, though it will impart a slightly nutty flavor into most dishes and have a grainier texture.

If you want to recreate your favorite Mexican dishes, like tamales and arepas, Gold Mine Masa Harina is a perfect choice. It contains just yellow corn and a hint of lime, while Bob's Red Mill Garbanzo Bean is ideal for making falafel and other Middle Eastern and Greek dishes.

Those who have a specific type of flour in mind, and simply want to find the best options of that particular one, should check out our dedicated lists for coconut, sorghum, chickpea, cassava, and almond flours, most of which are also going to be gluten free.


Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on June 04, 2020 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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