The 10 Best Nut Butter Machines

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This wiki has been updated 13 times since it was first published in May of 2020. If you like nut butters, but find that store-bought varieties contain chemicals and preservatives or other ingredients you do not like, not to mention that they are often quite expensive, take a look at these nut butter machines. They can simplify the process of making your own, whether you prefer peanuts, cashews or almonds, and are available in a wide variety of styles to suit most preferences. When users buy our independently chosen editorial recommendations, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki.

1. Breville Sous Chef 16

2. Vitamix 5200

3. Omega Nutrition Center

Editor's Notes

August 25, 2020:

Making nut butter at home awakens a longstanding debate: blenders or food processors? Properly chosen, either appliance can do the job well. General wisdom says that blenders are best for soft mixtures like smoothies and soups, while food processors are best for chopping and slicing. Nut butters fall somewhere in the middle, which can make the choices confusing.

Blenders can easily bog down chopping nuts, which is why our recommendations like the Vitamix 5200 have powerful motors. In general, blenders will work better with recipes that add oil or some other liquefying agent. Blenders also heat the butter more than food processors, which can be a concern for some heat-sensitive oils.

Food processors have larger and wider work bowls, which raises capacity and makes scraping the sides easier. Machines like the Braun FP3020 and Cuisinart Custom 14 are mid-range picks that can handle a variety of kitchen duties.

For both appliances, nut butters are a high-demand task that can fry underpowered motors. If you can afford it, it's best to get a model with a solid warranty like the Breville Sous Chef 16.

Though all these machines can make delicious butters, the best option may depend on what else you do in the kitchen. Smoothie devotees may be best served by a powerful blender, chefs may gravitate toward a food processor, and juice enthusiasts will enjoy the Omega Nutrition Center.

Nut butter lovers also have the option of a dedicated machine like the NutraMilk Nut Processor. These models make the most sense for buyers who eat nut butters and milks on a daily basis and find themselves frequently whipping up new batches.

Special Honors

Pleasant Hill Grain Old Tyme Nut Grinder For commercial operations (or truly dedicated home enthusiasts), this grinder provides a reliable method of mass production. It's much more expensive than most options, but it's easy to operate and capable of grinding up to 20 pounds at a time. pleasanthillgrain.com

NutraMilk Nut Processor Although it's pricey, this machine is specifically designed to make nut milks and butters quickly and effectively. It's less versatile than a food processor, but especially for those who use nut milks as dairy alternatives, it's cheaper long-term than buying from a store. thenutramilk.com

4. Braun FP3020

5. Cuisinart Custom 14

6. Ninja Mega Kitchen System

7. NutriBullet 1200

8. Premier Small Wonder

9. Vitamix E310 Explorian

10. Hamilton Beach 10-Cup


Christopher Thomas
Last updated on August 29, 2020 by Christopher Thomas

Building PCs, remodeling, and cooking since he was young, quasi-renowned trumpeter Christopher Thomas traveled the USA performing at and organizing shows from an early age. His work experiences led him to open a catering company, eventually becoming a sous chef in several fine LA restaurants. He enjoys all sorts of barely necessary gadgets, specialty computing, cutting-edge video games, and modern social policy. He has given talks on debunking pseudoscience, the Dunning-Kruger effect, culinary technique, and traveling. After two decades of product and market research, Chris has a keen sense of what people want to know and how to explain it clearly. He delights in parsing complex subjects for anyone who will listen -- because teaching is the best way to ensure that you understand things yourself.


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