Updated June 17, 2019 by Brett Dvoretz

The 10 Best Weighted Blankets

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This wiki has been updated 12 times since it was first published in November of 2017. Weighted blankets offer a form of touch therapy that can be deeply soothing to those with ADHD, autism, anxiety, depression, restless leg syndrome, and other conditions that keep people up at night. The added pressure from these makes the user feel safe and secure. Even if you don't suffer from insomnia, you may still enjoy the comforting feel of one of these. When users buy our independently chosen editorial choices, we may earn commissions to help fund the Wiki. Skip to the best weighted blanket on Amazon.

10. Rocabi Luxury

9. Weighted Idea Sensory

8. SensaCalm Therapeutic

7. Grampa's Garden WWBB

6. Platinum Health Deluxe Calmforter

5. Sensory Goods Fleece/Flannel

4. YnM Cotton

3. Weighted Blankets Plus Cotton/Flannel

2. Pine & River Minky

1. The Magic Blanket

Editor's Notes

June 17, 2019:

Kids and adults can benefit from weighted blankets, which is why we included options perfectly suited to both. We believe a child's option shouldn't just come in lighter weights, but also fun designs since kid's want their rooms to reflect their interests. If buying a weighted blanket for a child, we recommend taking a look at the Pine & River Minky, which comes in starry night, strawberry field, and other cherry prints. Another high-quality, kid-friendly option is the Grampa's Garden WWBB. For teens, a more mature design is probably in order, such as one you might buy for yourself, just in a lighter weight.

The Magic Blanket is one of the original companies to begin selling these products, and their blankets still prove to be some of the best, which is why they claimed our #1 spot. In addition to choosing the correct weight, it is smart to buy one with a material that fits the climate in which you live. For people who live in warm locations, that often means buying a breathable one, like the YnM Cotton or SensaCalm Therapeutic. Those living in a cold climate should look to minky or fleece ones, like the Sensory Goods Fleece/Flannel or Platinum Health Deluxe Calmforter. Another option is to choose the Weighted Idea Sensory, which is made from a breathable cotton, but comes with a minky duvet cover.

Whichever one you choose, the rule of thumb is never to exceed 15 percent of your body weight, with 10 percent usually being the most comfortable. Also, it is important never to put a weighted blanket on an infant, and generally recommended not to use one on a child under four years of age.

The Theory Behind Weighted Blankets

This can be useful if you tend to get restless, or if you just like the security of being cocooned in one spot.

It might seem counter-intuitive — if you suffer from anxiety, wouldn't some heavy, oppressive blanket weighing you down be the last thing you need?

Apparently not. An increasing number of people are discovering the benefits of weighted blankets, and while there's far from a scientific consensus on their effectiveness, there are some studies that show they may be able to help certain afflictions.

The basic idea is that a heavy blanket offers something called deep pressure stimulation, which is basically the same effect that you'd get from a hug or being swaddled as a baby. Since the therapeutic benefits of hugging are well-known, using a weighted blanket seems like a no-brainer.

Deep pressure stimulation is believed to increase serotonin levels in the body, which can help regulate your mood and promote a calming effect. It's not a substitute for medication, of course, but every little bit can help.

Many people also like how it helps hold them still. This can be useful if you tend to get restless, or if you just like the security of being cocooned in one spot. It's a feeling that's very reassuring — just like the touch of a loved one.

Of course, while a weighted blanket might be able to mimic the effect of cuddling up to somebody you love, it's no replacement for it. You'll still likely get more benefit from snuggling with your spouse than you will curling up under the blanket (which is presumably good news for your marriage).

So, go ahead and get a weighted blanket if you feel like you'd benefit from being wrapped up tight all night long — but let your partner know this doesn't let them off the hook for snuggle time.

Conditions That Weighted Blankets May Help

Weighted blankets are traditionally associated with anxiety, and for good reason — they can slow down the activity in your nervous system, which can quite literally calm your nerves.

If you're thinking your child can benefit from one of these blankets, monitor them at all times.

It's not just anxiety sufferers who can benefit, however. They've been shown to help reduce the effects of insomnia, allowing patients to finally get a good night's rest. The reasons are likely the same — reducing sensations in your nervous system can leave you calm and relaxed, helping to give you more refreshing sleep. Additionally, the blankets can inhibit movement, preventing tossing and turning.

Many people with sensory processing disorder or autism (especially those with tactile sensitivity) find that weighted blankets offer most of the benefits of hugging without actually having to touch another individual, which can be overwhelming. Also, since the blanket is just a blanket, instead of a person, the patient can have full control over it, which is extremely reassuring.

However, don't expect the blanket to be a miracle cure — and don't leave small children alone with it. While they're completely safe for adults and teens, at least two deaths of young children have been linked to their use, as the kids might not be able to free themselves from underneath the weight, and can get smothered as a result.

Granted, both instances were the result of gross misuse of the blankets — and one was downright abusive — but that still doesn't mean you shouldn't play it safe. If you're thinking your child can benefit from one of these blankets, monitor them at all times.

Ultimately, the jury is still out on how much these coverings can help, if at all. Still, many of them are worth a shot, especially since so many people find them incredibly comfortable.

Other Tips for Dealing With Anxiety

Anxiety can be a crippling condition, and the most important thing you can do if you're afflicted is to see a mental health specialist immediately. If that's not possible, however (and even if it is), there are a few lifestyle changes you can make to give yourself a little relief.

The first thing you should realize is that, just because your mind might be suffering, that doesn't mean that your body has to as well. Eat a balanced diet, exercise regularly, get enough sleep, and take good care of yourself.

Just try your best, remain positive, and let go of the results.

Any type of exercise will help, but yoga is especially fantastic, as it teaches you how to calm your inner thoughts in addition to toning your body. That can leave you both mentally and physically relaxed.

Meditation is another activity that's wonderful for soothing anxious nerves, as it can help you recognize and control invasive thoughts. Even better, it's free and you can do it anywhere, so you can just grab a cushion and get started. Don't just be alone with all your thoughts, though. Find someone you can talk to, whether that's a loved one, a clergy member, or a trained mental health professional.

Recognizing triggers is another thing that's extremely important. If you know that certain people or situations can set you off, you need to try to avoid them as best as possible. If that's not feasible, such as if it's a chronic work situation, then you can try other coping strategies like journaling or the aforementioned meditation. At some point, however, it may be worth considering whether your career is worth your mental health.

You also need to try to re-frame how you deal with the world. Recognize that not everything is within your control, so let yourself off the hook if things don't always work out like you think they should. Just try your best, remain positive, and let go of the results.

Humor works wonders for this. You can often find something funny about just about anything in life, so try to look at situations in a new light.

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Brett Dvoretz
Last updated on June 17, 2019 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as in front of a laptop screen, Brett can either be found hacking away furiously at the keyboard or, perhaps, enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He has been a professional chef, a dog trainer, and a travel correspondent for a well-known Southeast Asian guidebook. He also holds a business degree and has spent more time than he cares to admit in boring office jobs. He has an odd obsession for playing with the latest gadgets and working on motorcycles and old Jeeps. His expertise, honed over years of experience, is in the areas of computers, electronics, travel gear, pet products, and kitchen, office and automotive equipment.


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