10 Astute Investigations Into Money, Politics, And Crime

While they can be tricky topics to discuss at a dinner party, money, politics, and crime are intriguing forces that have a big influence on the world we live in. If you're interested in learning more about these fascinating subjects, you've come to the right place. The ten books listed here explore a variety of important and controversial issues in an engaging and entertaining way. When you click links from this website, we may receive advertising revenue to support our research. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

10 Astute Investigations Into Money, Politics, And Crime

Title Author More by the Author
1. The Oligarchs David E. Hoffman The Billion Dollar Spy The Dead Hand
2. The Attention Merchants Tim Wu The Master Switch Who Controls the Internet?
3. The Doomsday Machine Daniel Ellsberg Secrets Risk, Ambiguity and Decision
4. This Fight Is Our Fight Elizabeth Warren A Fighting Chance All Your Worth
5. The Chairman Kai Bird The Good Spy American Prometheus
6. Future Crimes Marc Goodman N/A
7. Black Edge Sheelah Kolhatkar N/A
8. White House Diary Jimmy Carter Faith A Full Life
9. Blackwater Jeremy Scahill Dirty Wars
10. Defying Reality David M. Ewalt Of Dice and Men

How Fear Drives American Politics

In Depth

There's nothing that can keep you on the edge of your seat like books that delve into controversial issues and reveal brooding mysteries. So whether you're interested in historical studies or thrilling tales of true crime, we've compiled some brilliant works of nonfiction that will feed your hunger for intriguing stories. In no particular order, here is our list of ten astute investigations into money, politics, and crime.

At #1 is "The Oligarchs," which examines the rise and fall of six businessmen who acquired massive wealth and power during the transitional period in Russia. David E. Hoffman chronicles how these men were able to take over the country's largest industries, transforming their economy from state-owned to private ownership. He also explores the roles they played, which led to their strong political influence. With comprehensive analysis of the Russian government, the book can help give you a better understanding of the country's past and present.

What we have at #2 is "The Attention Merchants," a thought-provoking narrative of how industries feed on human attention for immense profit. Tim Wu explains the business model of creating free enticing services and luring in a large number of people, whose information is sold to various advertisers for a high price.

Tim Wu explains the business model of creating free enticing services and luring in a large number of people, whose information is sold to various advertisers for a high price.

It delves into the history of these advertising platforms, which originated in the 19th century and have continued to evolve alongside search engines and social networking sites. Wu also examines the subtle yet ubiquitous methods of various corporations, and how the media can control and change our perception of the world.

At #3 is "The Doomsday Machine." Daniel Ellsberg, known for revealing the Pentagon Papers, uncovers the dangers of America's top secret nuclear program. Having worked as a military analyst in the 1960s, he recalls discovering private documents that estimated the number of people that would have been killed if the US had engaged in a nuclear strike against the Soviet Union and China.

Ellsberg points out that the plan is a crime against humanity and should have never been made in the first place. The book also unveils the program's chilling deployment policy, which permits certain military subordinates to launch WMDs, even without presidential authorization.

Ellsberg points out that the plan is a crime against humanity and should have never been made in the first place.

At #4 is "This Fight Is Our Fight." Coming from a middle-class family, Senator Elizabeth Warren expresses her dismay with the inability of regular working people to make a decent living in the once-thriving American economy. Her narrative begins with a comprehensive look at the 1960s, as she tells her story of how she was able to earn a degree, land a job, and attend law school because of a beneficent and free-spending government.

She also explores the problems that affect the working class such as inflation, high fixed expenses, unstable employment, and rising debt, among others. Moreover, Warren details the political roots of these issues, which she notes started during the Reagan administration and were sparked once again with the election of Donald Trump.

At #5 is "The Chairman," a comprehensive biography of John J. McCloy. Kai Bird vividly details the rise of the Wall Street lawyer who was once known as "the most influential private citizen in America." With information regarding his career and personal life, the narrative delves into all of McCloy's roles in business and politics, such as his involvement in World War II, being an adviser to nine presidents, and becoming the chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Chase Manhattan Bank, and World Bank, among others.

With information regarding his career and personal life, the narrative delves into all of McCloy's roles in business and politics, such as his involvement in World War II, being an adviser to nine presidents, and becoming the chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Chase Manhattan Bank, and World Bank, among others.

Bird also captures McCloy's struggles from being born to a poor family, and explains his controversial decisions that influenced the American political landscape.

Coming in at #6 is "Future Crimes." Marc Goodman presents a mind-boggling narrative about the threats that lurk in new and emerging technologies. Having spent a career in law enforcement, Goodman explains the different types of cybercrimes that occur on a daily basis on the internet. He describes how hackers, businesses, stalkers, and even the mafia can obtain intimate details about anyone, and shows how they make money out of invasions of privacy.

With intricate details about the future possibilities of technology, the book also offers strategies and best practices that readers can use to protect themselves in the digital age.

With intricate details about the future possibilities of technology, the book also offers strategies and best practices that readers can use to protect themselves in the digital age.

What we have at #7 is "Black Edge," a gripping account of Steven Cohen's ascent to the pinnacle of finance, and the efforts of prosecutors to charge him for illegal insider trading. Sheelah Kolhatkar gives us a thorough insight into a colossal investment scandal, and how hedge fund managers make billions by using inside information. She also analyses a number of materials, such as court documents and interviews, and weaves them into a readable procedural thriller.

At #8 is "White House Diary." Former United States President Jimmy Carter presents us with an intimate view of his thoughts, impressions, accomplishments, and frustrations during his years in the office. Full of retrospective insights about the people and events that formed his presidency, the book shares his blunt comments on various political topics, and his interactions with foreign leaders, government officials, and personalities.

At #9 is "Blackwater," a thrilling study about the rise of a private mercenary company based in North Carolina. Jeremy Scahill traces its origin and reveals its powerful political ties, shedding light on the industry that outsources military tasks to an independent corporation. He also explores the life of its founder, Erik Prince, tackling his family's history, influence, and beliefs. Moreover, Scahill documents Blackwater's involvement in a massacre in Iraq in 2007, as well as several other controversial missions.

Moreover, Scahill documents Blackwater's involvement in a massacre in Iraq in 2007, as well as several other controversial missions.

Finally, at #10 is "Defying Reality," an in-depth look at the history, development, and future of virtual reality. David M. Ewalt gives us various methods of how this groundbreaking technology will likely impact several facets of our lives such as health care, politics, and commerce, and explains how it can change the way we interact with one another.

He also unravels the story of Oculus founder Palmer Luckey, who created his company at a young age and sold it to Facebook for two billion dollars. The book tackles how the tech genius took part in supporting Donald Trump on the 2016 presidential election, which demonstrates the significance of money in politics.