10 Gay And Lesbian Stories Set In Fantastical Worlds

LGBTQ+ literature has been a growing part of the literary market for decades. People are seeking out more explicit representation of their lives that doesn't perpetuate harmful stereotypes, or are genuinely interested in learning about others who are different than them. That has lead to new opportunities, where authors can write queer stories that go beyond confessional prose or autobiography. These are some examples of the best gay and lesbian literature with fantastical elements available today. When you click links from this website, we may receive advertising revenue to support our research. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Great Gay And Lesbian Fantasy Fiction

  1. The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza by Shaun David Hutchinson
  2. That Alien Feeling by Alessandra Hazard
  3. The Magpie Lord by KJ Charles
  4. Hell & High Water by Charlie Cochet
  5. Captive by Jex Lane
  6. Locked by Anyta Sunday
  7. Clockwork Heart by Heidi Cullinan
  8. Captive Prince by C. S. Pacat
  9. The Lightning-Struck Heart by TJ Klune
  10. The Sumage Solution: San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger

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In Depth

Over the decades, books discussing homosexuality are being welcomed by more readers everywhere. If you are curious about literary works regarding gays and lesbians, you can check out these 10 stories set in fantastical worlds. Please note that this list is in no particular order.

Starting off at #1 is "The Apocalypse of Elena Mendoza." It was penned by Florida-based writer Shaun David Hutchinson. It talks about Elena, a teenager who works at a coffee shop and has a crush on a girl named Freddie. She also has the power to heal people. However, when the main character restores a person's life, another one loses theirs. They disappear into thin air, never to be seen again.

Hutchinson offers an alternative perspective on the theological doctrine of the Rapture. He also tackles themes about diversity, free will, and morality. His work is intended to be read by young adults.

Hutchinson offers an alternative perspective on the theological doctrine of the Rapture.

At #2 is a book called "That Alien Feeling." Written by Alessandra Hazard, it tells the story of Prince Harht'ngh'chaali, an extraterrestrial royal who is exiled from his home planet and sent to live on Earth. Although it is meant as a form of punishment, he thinks of his banishment as an adventure. He adopts the name "Harry" and tries to fit into human society. While working as a barista, he befriends Adam, a financial analyst.

Even though the first few chapters revolve around the protagonists' burgeoning friendship, the author manages to shift the context from light-hearted to melodramatic as complications enter the duo's relationship. In the end, forgiveness prevails in Hazard's novel.

At #3 is "The Magpie Lord." It is the first of the "A Charm of Magpies" series. Its creator, K. J. Charles, embraces a paranormal fantasy motif. The plot is set during the Victorian era.

Its creator, K. J. Charles, embraces a paranormal fantasy motif.

It is a tale of a banished English earl named Lucien Vaudrey. Also referred to as "Lord Crane," he seeks out a shaman who can heal his mysterious ailment. Manservant Merrick brings in Stephen the magician in order to cure his master's sickness. It turns out that Crane has been placed under an evil spell. Soon, the mage discovers that his subject is the son of the man he hates the most. Even so, the priest-doctor tries to bring around Vaudrey's life, and is determined to find the root of the royal's occult illness.

At #4 is "Hell and High Water" by Charlie Cochet. It is a part of a suspenseful urban series about an elite military organization called "THIRDS." It takes place where men coexist with Therians, individuals with altered human DNA.

Enter Dexter J. Daley, a homicide detective who is selected as a member of the defense agency. Together with his mutant partner Sloane Brodie, they are assigned on a dangerous mission to catch the criminal who murdered three activists. Aside from this operation, Dex must face his personal struggles and prove that he is a worthy member of the team.

Together with his mutant partner Sloane Brodie, they are assigned on a dangerous mission to catch the criminal who murdered three activists.

At #5 is a work of fiction called "Captive," the initial installment in the "Beautiful Monsters" anthology. Created by Jex Lane, it establishes the story of an imaginary world where vampires and demons are at war.

This novel narrates the tale of Matthew Callahan, a vampire who has restricted himself to solitude while struggling to curb his hunger for human blood. However, he gets captured by an incubus general named Tarrick who uses him as a weapon against his own breed. Eventually, the prisoner is hindered by his inner conflict. In his mind, he needs freedom. But in his heart, he wants to stay with his new master.

At #6 is "Locked," the first book in the "Telluric Realm" collection by Anyta Sunday. It centers on how life turns around for marble-maker Rye Cunnings as he learns about his true identity as the lost prince from a peculiar kingdom.

It centers on how life turns around for marble-maker Rye Cunnings as he learns about his true identity as the lost prince from a peculiar kingdom.

The protagonist is brought back to his homeland by a warrior called Cerdic, and the mystery behind his past begins to unravel. As he explores a whole new domain where magic and dragons dwell, he also discovers the bitter reality of vengeance and political intrigue.

At #7 is "Clockwork Heart" by Heidi Cullinan. This piece of fiction revolves around a mythical instrument that was implanted into Johann Berger's heart. It was done by a tinker named Cornelius in order to save the soldier's life. But things get messy when they find out that warring nations are seeking the same device, and are determined to kill anyone to acquire it. The two merge with their buccaneer friends in order to face their enemies.

The author has set the plot in an alternate history where Austria and France are hostile, with the inclusion of pirates, mobsters, and rogues.

The author has set the plot in an alternate history where Austria and France are hostile, with the inclusion of pirates, mobsters, and rogues.

At #8 is the novel "Captive Prince." It was penned by Australian writer C. S. Pacat, and it is the beginning of a series with the same title. It tells the story of Prince Damen of Akielos who is supposedly next in line to the throne.

However, upon his father's death, his half-brother takes his place as the ruler of the kingdom. His title is removed and he is sent to Vere as a slave. He is then taken to his new master Laurent, the prince from the rival nation. Damen must now conceal his true identity in order to survive. Pacat's self-published trilogy covers topics such as personal struggles and political turmoil.

At #9 is TJ Klune's "The Lightning-Struck Heart." It is the first installment of the epic fantasy collection "Tales From Verania."

It talks about an ordinary slum boy named Sam Haversford. He discovers that he has supernatural abilities when he accidentally turns a group of bullies into stone. Because of this, he is brought to another world to become Wizard Morgan's apprentice. There, he learns the craft of magic and sorcery. One day, Prince Justin gets kidnapped by a dragon. Sam now teams up with the new knight Ryan Foxheart and goes on a mission to rescue the king's son.

Finally, at #10 is "The Sumage Solution" from the "San Andreas Shifters" anthology. It centers on Max, a failed mage who develops an attitude problem due to his bitter childhood. While working at DURPS, he meets Bryan, the good-natured biker werewolf who is busy preparing documents for the pack. As the story unfolds, the young magician's dark past is revealed and will play a pivotal role in their relationship.

Writer G.L. Carriger utilizes banter and humor throughout. She also employs alternating points of view between the main characters.