10 Wonderful Works of Fiction Written By & About Women

Whether you're a woman, a feminist, or just interested in having a more diverse range of perspectives represented on your bookshelf, seeking out works written by female authors is an awesome way to expand your horizons. Who knows? Your new favorite book may be one of these ten wonderful novels, written by & about women. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

10 Wonderful Works of Fiction Written By & About Women

Title Author More by the Author
1. Ten Beach Road Wendy Wax Ocean Beach
2. The Lake of Dreams Kim Edwards The Memory Keeper's Daughter
3. The Admissions Meg Mitchell Moore So Far Away
4. The Children Ann Leary The Good House
5. The Private Life of Mrs. Sharma Ratika Kapur Overwinter
6. The Space Between Dete Meserve Perfectly Good Crime
7. The Life Lucy Knew Karma Brown The Choices We Make
8. Enchanted August Brenda Bowen
9. Things You Can't Take Erin Lockwood Planning Penelope
10. All of Us and Everything Bridget Asher The Provence Cure for the Brokenhearted

Inspiring Quotes From Successful Women

Quote Source
"A woman with a voice is by definition a strong woman." Melinda Gates
"I believe that it is as much a right and duty for women to do something with their lives as for men and we are not going to be satisfied with such frivolous parts as you give us." Louisa May Alcott
"One's feelings waste themselves in words; they ought all to be distilled into actions which bring results." Florence Nightingale
"If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again!" Sojourner Truth
"It doesn't matter who you are, where you come from. The ability to triumph begins with you. Always." Oprah Winfrey

Celebrating Women Writers

In Depth

Across all genres, there are many novels about female protagonists struggling with relatable problems that can range from family issues to more sensitive matters, like sexual harassment and gender discrimination. Not only are these stories entertaining, they can also be very empowering as they feature characters who learn to overcome difficulties similar to what the readers may be experiencing in real life. With that in mind, we've compiled a list of ten wonderful works of fiction written by and about women. Take note that this list is done in no particular order.

First up, at #1, we have "Ten Beach Road." Written by Wendy Wax, it's the first entry of her eponymous series. After falling victim to a Ponzi scheme, Madeline, Avery, and Nikki are left with a rundown beachfront mansion called the Bella Flora. As they work together to restore the old house, they learn more about each other's lives and eventually become friends. Over time, secrets behind the scam that ruined their lives are uncovered, breaking the trust that the three of them worked hard to build.

Next, at #2, is "The Lake of Dreams" by Kim Edwards. Around a decade after her father's death, Lucy Jarrett decides to finally come home when she receives news that her mother has been injured in an unfortunate accident. One day, Lucy stumbles upon a collection of old items that reveal shocking facts about her family's past. It's an emotional tale that tackles historical issues like women's suffrage.

Around a decade after her father's death, Lucy Jarrett decides to finally come home when she receives news that her mother has been injured in an unfortunate accident.

At #3 is "The Admissions" by Meg Mitchell Moore. It's about the upper-middle-class Hawthorne family, whose members are all facing a lot of pressure in their lives. The parents, Nora and Gabe, are too consumed by their jobs, and they're both hiding secrets that could ruin their family. Their daughters, Angela, Cecily, and Maya, each have issues that they're having trouble dealing with, ranging from substance abuse to learning disabilities.

Next up, at #4, we have "The Children" by Ann Leary. Charlotte Maynard lives in her parents' home, where she runs a popular blog that talks about a family that doesn't actually exist. When her stepfather dies, her stepbrothers Spin and Perry inherit the house. One summer, Spin decides to bring his fiance home with him, which leads to a lot of uncomfortable secrets suddenly being uncovered, threatening the fragile relationships among the members of their blended family.

At #5 is "The Private Life of Mrs. Sharma" by Ratika Kapur. Renuka Sharma is a 37-year-old receptionist whose husband is working abroad in order to save up enough money to move his family to a better place in India. When she encounters an eccentric man named Vineet, she slowly sheds her traditional values and starts an affair with him. Now, Renuka struggles to keep her private life a secret from her family, especially with her husband coming home soon.

Now, Renuka struggles to keep her private life a secret from her family, especially with her husband coming home soon.

Next, at #6, is "The Space Between" by Dete Meserve. After presenting a major scientific breakthrough to NASA, renowned astronomer Sarah Mayfield comes home to discover that her husband, Ben, has mysteriously disappeared. All Ben left behind was a loaded gun and a suspicious bank deposit of a million dollars. Now, Sarah has to dig deep into her husband's dark past in order to figure out what's going on. It's a suspenseful story full of many twists and turns that are sure to keep readers glued to their seats.

At #7 is "The Life Lucy Knew" by Karma Brown. After an unfortunate accident, Lucy wakes up in a hospital and starts looking for her husband. She soon realizes that she's suffering from amnesia and has false memories. The man she remembers as her husband is actually her ex-fiance, who she broke up with four years ago. With the help of her boyfriend Matt, who she only remembers as a colleague, Lucy tries to make sense of her life and figure out which of her memories are real.

Next up, at #8, we have "Enchanted August" by Brenda Bowen. Lottie Wilkes needs a break from her turbulent marriage, so she decides to spend a month at a cottage in Maine. In order to afford the rent, she and her friend Rose invite two other strangers with them: Caroline, a disgraced actress, and Beverly, an old man who recently lost his partner. It's a story about four damaged individuals rediscovering love, and a brilliant modern retelling of Elizabeth von Arnim's "The Enchanted April".

Lottie Wilkes needs a break from her turbulent marriage, so she decides to spend a month at a cottage in Maine.

At #9 is "Things You Can't Take" by Erin Lockwood. Abigail and Kessia first met each other on the set of a commercial, and they instantly became best friends. Over the years, Abigail grows up to become a famous celebrity, while Kessia continues to support her friend by working as her personal assistant. Their lives are changed forever when Kessia is sexually assaulted by a Hollywood producer, which causes Abigail to take matters into her own hands.

Finally, at #10, we have "All of Us and Everything" by Bridget Asher. Sisters Esme, Liv, and Ru grew up with an absentee father, who they were led to believe was an international spy. Now adults, the three sisters are dealing with a plethora of personal issues stemming from their unusual upbringing. When they're reunited with their mother after a devastating hurricane hits their childhood home, they uncover a box full of letters that reveal the truth about their father, and change their lives for the better.