6 Attractions In Tennessee Perfect For Families

When on a family vacation, it's tough to find something to do that everyone can enjoy. Luckily, there are many options in Tennessee that are multi-faceted, so there's something for everyone. Ranging from yearly festivals to museums, each of these destinations has offerings for visitors both young and old. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

6 Exciting Places To Visit In Tennessee

Attraction Location Features
Loretta Lynn's Ranch Hurricane Mills Coal Miner's Daughter Museum, dolls and gifts sent by fans, Frontier Homestead, Grist Mill Museum, and Native American artifacts
Nashville Farmers' Market Nashville Fresh produce, baked goods, crafts, Grow Local Kitchen, and 18,000-square-foot Gardens of Babylon
Theatre Memphis Memphis Two performance spaces staging musicals, dramatic plays, and comedies, along with classes and other educational programs
Memphis in May International Festival Memphis Beale Street Music Festival, World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest, Great American River Run, International Salute to Ghana, and more fun cultural events
Cheekwood Estate & Gardens Nashville Botanical gardens, art exhibits, woodland sculpture trail, model trains, "The Little Engine That Could," playhouse, and a scenic walking bridge
Pink Palace Family of Museums Memphis Science and history museum, planetarium, nature center, historic houses, and the CTI 3D Giant Theater

Theatre Memphis' Summer Performance Workshop presents "Marjorie and the Magic Words"

Notable People From Tennessee

The Great American River Run in Memphis

In Depth

Tennessee is a state full of interesting sites, from lush gardens to fascinating museums. We've gathered six attractions, listed here in no particular order, that visitors young and old are sure to enjoy. Whether you live in the Volunteer State or are planning a trip there soon, you should take the time to check them out.

First up, at #1, we have Loretta Lynn's Ranch. Overnight visitors have the option to camp in their own tent or RV or rent a cabin equipped with a kitchenette, satellite TV, and wifi. Once you've settled into your accommodations, you can enjoy activities like canoeing, swimming, and seasonal special events. If you want to explore the area, you can sign up for a tour of Loretta's Plantation Home, Butcher Holler Home Place, a simulated coal mine, and more.

History buffs, or those looking to get some educational value out of their family vacation, can check out Western Town. Located above the waterfall that powers the historic grist mill, it contains museums that showcase everything from Native American artifacts to dolls, as well as several shops where you can purchase souvenirs. If you're interested in spending some time on the ranch, you can book a reservation by calling ahead.

Located above the waterfall that powers the historic grist mill, it contains museums that showcase everything from Native American artifacts to dolls, as well as several shops where you can purchase souvenirs.

In the #2 spot is Nashville Farmers' Market, where you can find everything from food to crafts all year long. At the Farm Sheds, shoppers can browse a variety of goods, including fresh produce grown by local farmers, baked goods, and non-edible items made by artists or curated by flea merchants. The offerings change with the seasons, so you'll find strawberries in the spring, peaches and tomatoes in the summer, and pumpkins in the fall. Vendors also vary each day, so repeat customers can always find something new.

The 18,000-square-foot Gardens of Babylon is a locally-owned plant nursery and landscaping company that is open daily. Longtime gardeners and beginners alike can talk to the experienced staff and learn new techniques to bring their greenery to the next level. The Market House is home to twenty locally-owned shops and restaurants. If you want to support the farm-to-table movement, you can spend a day shopping at the farmers' market, or sign up for a culinary class or workshop at the Grow Local Kitchen.

For #3, we have Theatre Memphis, the second oldest arts organization in the city. Its campus features two venues that put on shows throughout the year, as well as a sculpture garden that showcases original works by Lawrence K. Anthony. Shows are regularly put on both at the 411-seat, proscenium Lohrey Stage and the more intimate black box Next Stage, including musicals, dramatic plays, and comedies.

Shows are regularly put on both at the 411-seat, proscenium Lohrey Stage and the more intimate black box Next Stage, including musicals, dramatic plays, and comedies.

As a community theater, all of the cast and crew members are volunteers, and auditions are open and publicly advertised so anyone who's interested in trying out for a part can give it a shot. The Outreach and Education Department also hosts classes for the public, which can be a good opportunity for newcomers to get some training in before jumping into a full production. Mentor and residency programs benefit children who are typically underserved in the arts. You can support these efforts and others by making a tax-deductible donation.

Our #4 pick is Memphis in May International Festival. Conceived in the 1970s as a way to promote the numerous events that happen in the area each year, such as the Cotton Carnival, the Danny Thomas Golf Classic, and the annual visit by the Metropolitan Opera, the organization is dedicated to celebrating local culture, fostering economic growth, and enhancing international awareness through education.

Events include Beale Street Music Festival, which runs for multiple days and features several talented musical acts, and the Great American River Run, a race that goes from the streets of Downtown Memphis to the banks of the Mississippi River. There's also plenty of food to sample and craft vendors to browse. The educational program allows local youth to immerse themselves in the culture of the year's honored country through competitions, international exchanges, and more. If you're interested in helping out, you can sign up to volunteer.

Events include Beale Street Music Festival, which runs for multiple days and features several talented musical acts, and the Great American River Run, a race that goes from the streets of Downtown Memphis to the banks of the Mississippi River.

In the #5 spot, we have Cheekwood Estate and Gardens. Located on fifty-five acres in Nashville, it was originally built as the home of Leslie and Mabel Cheek in 1929. It has since been converted into a museum of art and a botanical garden. Visitors can enjoy a permanent collection of fine art, rotating exhibitions that feature both touring shows and artists from the on-site residence program, and the Carell Woodland Sculpture Trail, which features both manmade and natural beauty.

There's plenty for children to enjoy as well, from seasonal events to a popular exhibit that features model trains, a playhouse inspired by "The Little Engine That Could," and a scenic walking bridge. People of all ages can appreciate the lovely gardens, which feature a variety of plants from well-manicured shrubs to colorful flowers. Community programs allow locals to get involved with Cheekwood. Those who want to support the organization can go online and sign up for a membership.

Finally, at #6, is the Pink Palace Family of Museums. Featuring a planetarium, a 3D giant theater, a fossil site and more, this attraction caters to a wide variety of art lovers, science fans, and curious people young and old. The ornate Georgian mansion that gives the organization its name was designed to be the dream home of wealthy entrepreneur Clarence Saunders, but when he went bankrupt during the 1920s, the unfinished building was given to the city for use as a museum. It currently houses natural science exhibits on the first floor and cultural history on the second.

Featuring a planetarium, a 3D giant theater, a fossil site and more, this attraction caters to a wide variety of art lovers, science fans, and curious people young and old.

The Sharpe Planetarium is home to a large dome that gives viewers an immersive experience as they explore the stars. Those who are more interested in their home planet can go to the Lichterman Nature Center and learn about life cycles, urban wildlife, the ways humans impact Earth, and more. There are also two historic houses, built in the 19th century, that offer a glimpse into what life was like over a hundred years ago. You can help kids from low-income families visit for free by donating to the Open Doors, Open Minds program.