6 Beautiful Historic Sites In The Eastern U.S.

Some of America's oldest and most historically significant buildings and sites can be found in the Eastern U.S. From homes of prominent citizens to theaters that have been running continuously for decades, there are plenty of wonderful places to visit. Whether you live in the area or are planning a trip, be sure to check out these six beautiful historic sites. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Historic Places In The Eastern United States

Organization Location Mission
Thomas Cole National Historic Site Catskill, NY Preserve and interpret the home and studios of Thomas Cole, the founder of the Hudson River School of painting, the nation's first art movement
Olana State Historic Site Hudson, NY Inspire the public by preserving and interpreting Frederic Church's Olana, a National Historic Landmark within the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area
Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University Chicago, IL Present the finest in international, cultural, community, and educational programming to Chicago, and restore and preserve the National Historic Landmark Auditorium Theatre
Ruthmere Elkhart, IN Inspire the imagination and promote excellence in fine arts, architecture, and historic preservation to advocate life-long learning and the entrepreneurial spirit
Germanna Locust Grove, VA Tell America's story of liberty through the frontier experience of her settlers and descendants using archaeological, historical, and genealogical research and interpretation
Stonehurst Waltham, MA Provoke thought and provide historical perspective on contemporary social and environmental issues by ensuring that diverse audiences enjoy, appreciate, and draw inspiration from Stonehurst and the legacy of its creators

Timeline Of Early Eastern U.S. History

Year Event
c. 1570 The Iroquois Confederacy is formed, uniting five tribes in the region
1607 The Virginia Company of London establishes the Jamestown Colony
1626 Manhattan Island is purchased from the Lenape tribe
1692 Witchcraft trials begin in Salem, Massachusetts
1776 The American founding fathers sign the Declaration of Independence
1811 The Battle of Tippecanoe is fought and won by William Henry Harrison
1860 - 1861 Seven southern states secede from the union, leading to the start of the American Civil War

Ways To Engage In Lifelong Learning

  • Visit a museum
  • Read both fiction and non-fiction as often as you can
  • Teach others what you know
  • Explore new places
  • Start a creative project, like a vlog or podcast
  • Get a good desk for your home
  • Join a study group
  • Take a hike through nature
  • Listen to different types of music
  • Look up words you don't know in the dictionary

The Importance Of Historic Preservation

In Depth

With a rich and fascinating past, the United States today honors its earlier ancestors and the places they lived, worked, and socialized in a variety of ways. From museums brimming with paintings and artifacts to theaters where you can almost feel the pull of history, America remains dedicated to remembering all the people who came before us. If you are interested in learning more about some of these exciting places, then here are, in no particular order, six beautiful historic sites in the Eastern U.S.

Coming in at #1 is the Thomas Cole National Historic Site. Located in the village of Catskill, New York, and named after the American artist at the forefront of the Hudson River School, this non-profit organization seeks to inject Cole's creativity into everything it does. As an attraction, it preserves and showcases the artist's home and studios, while also providing educational opportunities for its visitors.

"The Parlors," a multimedia art installation, gives visitors a chance to view paintings and correspondence on display while listening to Cole's writing narrated by a voice actor. Outdoors, the Hudson River School Art Trail, a collaborative project between the Thomas Cole National Historic Site and other organizations, allows all who are curious to explore the scenery that inspired the art. If you are interested in getting involved with this nonprofit, you can purchase items at its gift shop or sign up to become an official member.

Outdoors, the Hudson River School Art Trail, a collaborative project between the Thomas Cole National Historic Site and other organizations, allows all who are curious to explore the scenery that inspired the art.

At #2 is Olana State Historic Site. Once the home of landscape painter Frederic Church, it now serves as a popular attraction for lovers of art and nature. A National Historic Landmark, Olana comprises not only Church's home but also over 250 acres of grounds with sweeping views of the Hudson Valley, which visitors can explore through daily walking or driving tours of the landscape.

Inside the home, visitors can take specialized tours covering topics like Church's involvement with the Hudson River School, the architecture and design of the building, and the historic nature of its interiors. Furthermore, on the second floor, it hosts a series of annual exhibitions as well, with past ones focusing on Impressionism and the Caribbean and the Panama Canal. If you wish to support this nonprofit, consider signing up to volunteer as a tour guide or making a donation.

In the #3 spot is the Auditorium Theatre of Roosevelt University, conceived of by Ferdinand Peck and first opened in 1889. A not-for-profit organization committed to the values of diversity, innovation, and excellence, it calls itself "the theatre for the people," endeavoring to make the arts accessible to all across the city of Chicago. Known for its Romanesque facade and impressive architecture, the building houses intricate mosaics, murals, and other unique details.

Known for its Romanesque facade and impressive architecture, the building houses intricate mosaics, murals, and other unique details.

Each year, the Auditorium Theatre hosts a variety of shows, ranging from ballet productions and live music to talks with authors and Irish dance performances. It also runs a series of robust educational opportunities, including a teacher development program and an annual summer camp called Hearts to Art for young people who have experienced the death of a parent. Those who are interested in supporting the Auditorium Theatre can purchase tickets to one of its many shows, sign up to take a tour, or even rent the space for a private event.

At #4 is Ruthmere. Named after the only child of A.R. Beardsley and Elizabeth Baldwin Beardsley, this multifaceted cultural and historical museum home stands in the town of Elkhart, Indiana. Its campus contains a number of significant attractions, including a collection of gardens, the Ruthmere Mansion, the Havilah Beardsley House, and the Robert B. Beardsley Arts Reference Library. The Mansion itself, built in 1910, is in the Beaux-Arts style and can be accessed through docent-led tours.

Ruthmere hosts a diverse range of programs and events that the public can attend throughout the year. On Saturday mornings in the summer, visitors can check out Coffee on the Piazza, a social gathering with live acoustic music. Those who prefer tea to coffee are in luck too, with Ruthmere holding teatime on different dates during the year, including a special holiday-themed one with Mrs. Claus. In addition, there are a number of classical music concerts held in its Game Room. Those who are interested in supporting Ruthmere can attend one of its events or sign up to become a Ruthmere Champion.

Ruthmere hosts a diverse range of programs and events that the public can attend throughout the year.

Coming in at #5 is Germanna. Run by the Memorial Foundation of the Germanna Colonies in Virginia, a nonprofit founded in 1956, this historic site celebrates the heritage of the earliest organized settlements of Germans in colonial Virginia during the first half of the eighteenth century. Today, more than 100,000 Americans, Canadians, and Australians trace their family back to Germanna.

The site boasts several interesting attractions. Its Visitor Center, dedicated in 2000, has a unique spiral staircase and contains its own library with genealogical material and rare books. Outside, the Memorial Garden offers a beautiful outdoor space for people to experience nature; it also can be used for ceremonial events. Nearby is the 170-acre Siegen Forest, with four different hiking trails that can be explored. If you are interested in getting involved with Germanna, consider becoming an official member, a designation that allows you to receive its quarterly newsletter.

Finally, at #6 is Stonehurst. Maintained by a nonprofit founded in 1991 called the Friends of Stonehurst, this historic site was once the home of social reformers Robert Treat Paine and Lydia Lyman Paine and their family. Designed by architect Henry Hobson Richardson and landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, this country home sits on a secluded hilltop surrounded by over one hundred acres of public conservation land.

Maintained by a nonprofit founded in 1991 called the Friends of Stonehurst, this historic site was once the home of social reformers Robert Treat Paine and Lydia Lyman Paine and their family.

A National Historic Landmark, Stonehurst is now a cherished museum that can be accessed by the public via guided tours. Furthermore, visitors can explore the numerous trails that wind their way around the grounds. The organization also hosts a number of special programs and events throughout the year, including clean-up efforts and woodland walks. If you are interested in showing your support for Stonehurst, you can make a donation or purchase items through its online shop.