The 10 Best Bicycle Repair Stands

Updated August 04, 2017 by Brett Dvoretz

10 Best Bicycle Repair Stands
Best High-End
Best Mid-Range
Best Inexpensive
We spent 43 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. Cycling is both an economical form of transport and helps you stay fit. So when your ride needs a little work or a tune-up, make it a whole lot easier with one of these bicycle repair stands. They'll give you hands-free access to brakes, cables, chains and any bolts that need adjusting or tightening. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best bicycle repair stand on Amazon.

10. Best Choice SKY1470

The Best Choice SKY1470 has blue accents on all the adjustable parts, making it simple to navigate. It also has a stabilizer that holds your front wheel in place, making your work easier, but there are several flimsy plastic parts.
  • budget-friendly price
  • clamp can be difficult to work
  • doesn't fold down for storage
Brand Best Choice Products
Model SKY1470
Weight 16.2 pounds
Rating 4.0 / 5.0

9. CyclingDeal Aluminum

The CyclingDeal Aluminum features adjustments that are all made with dependable cam levers and pins to keep the head at any angle you place it. It's perfect for cleaning dirty bikes because it lets you access hard-to-reach places.
  • touches the floor at three points
  • holds bikes firmly in place
  • takes a while to fold and unfold
Brand CyclingDeal
Model pending
Weight 12.8 pounds
Rating 4.0 / 5.0

8. Yaheetech Mechanic

The Yaheetech Mechanic is one of the few models that has predrilled holes in the feet, allowing you to set it up for permanent installation in commercial bicycle shops. Additionally, it features an adjustable handlebar rod to keep your front tire from swiveling.
  • wide height adjustment range
  • included tool tray is small
  • cannot be placed next to a wall
Brand Yaheetech
Model pending
Weight pending
Rating 3.8 / 5.0

7. Confidence Telescopic

The Confidence Telescopic features a clamp that fits all standard bike frames and is made with robust steel, giving it a high maximum load capacity. It can handle daily use for years, and has a magnet on the tool tray to attach loose parts while you're working.
  • comes with a hex head wrench
  • four legs for optimal stability
  • cushions on the clamps can fall off
Brand Confidence
Model pending
Weight pending
Rating 3.8 / 5.0

6. Bikehand Pro YC-100

The Bikehand Pro YC-100 has a clamp that can attach to the seat post or top tube, making it a versatile option. There is a built-in tray for easy tool organization and retrieval, plus the shaft doesn't flex under heavy loads, giving you a sense of security while you work.
  • enough clearance to rotate pedals
  • nicely padded clamp jaws
  • assembly instructions are vague
Brand Bikehand
Model YC-100BH
Weight 12.6 pounds
Rating 4.1 / 5.0

5. Park Tool PCS-10

The Park Tool PCS-10 is made for the serious home mechanic who plans on working on their bicycle on a regular basis. It can accommodate a wide range of frame types, which means you'll probably wind up working on your buddy's bike too, and it allows for one-handed clamping.
  • topple-free stance
  • jaw covers can be replaced as needed
  • can clamp vertically or horizontally
Brand Park Tool
Model Park Tool
Weight 29 pounds
Rating 3.9 / 5.0

4. Venzo Workstand

The Venzo Workstand is a full aluminum alloy model, making it lightweight, sturdy, and durable. The clamp itself has a shark teeth-like inner lining made from rubber that holds securely onto nearly any frame without the possibility of damaging it.
  • legs never slide during use
  • very stable when loaded with a bike
  • backed by a 5-year warranty
Brand Venzo
Model pending
Weight 9.2 pounds
Rating 4.3 / 5.0

3. Feedback Sports Pro Ultralight

The Feedback Sports Pro Ultralight is, as the name implies, quite lightweight, yet surprisingly sturdy. It is engineered from anti-rust aluminum tubing that will stay looking like new for years to come, and has a simple slide-lock clamp.
  • can support up to 85 pounds
  • extremely compact when not in use
  • height adjustable for comfort
Brand Feedback Sports
Model 16415
Weight 12.2 pounds
Rating 4.9 / 5.0

2. Conquer 400-TQXL

The Conquer 400-TQXL is bright orange, so you can always find it, even in a messy, unorganized garage. It offers a solid construction, can grasp onto frames from 30mm to 75mm, and has a recessed trough in the clamp that can hold your brake cables.
  • includes a tool tray
  • easy to set up in minutes
  • great value for under 50 dollars
Brand Conquer
Model 400-TQXL-03
Weight 16.4 pounds
Rating 4.6 / 5.0

1. Topeak PrepStand Pro

The Topeak PrepStand Pro has an integrated scale so you can see exactly how much your bike weighs and figure out what components you may be able to remove or replace to lighten the load. It also features extra long tripod legs for stability on all types of surfaces.
  • rotating fast-release clamp
  • comes with a storage bag
  • rubber clamp jaws
Brand Topeak
Model 68001101
Weight 16.7 pounds
Rating 4.5 / 5.0

Why You Need A Bicycle Repair Stand

Dedicated cyclists know that a bike regularly needs tune-ups and going to a pro shop for all of your maintenance can quickly become very expensive. After enough wear and tear on your ride, things like the shifter cables and gear shifts can become loose or stiff, depending on the conditions they are subjected to. When trying to work on a bicycle, it is readily apparent that leaning it against a wall or lying it flat on the ground doesn't give you the access needed to different angles for efficient work. This is where a bicycle repair stand can be invaluable.

Bike repair stands let you hold your bicycle in place so the body and wheels don’t pivot when you’re applying tools to it. They also allow you to elevate your bicycle, so you can better view and comfortably access every part of it. There are two types of bicycle stands; tube clamping and axle/bottom bracket mounts. The first one uses clamps to grab your bicycle either on the body tube or seat. Tube clamping stands are commonly used among bicycle hobbyists because they can accommodate the shape and layout of most bicycles. If you watch a professional bike race, you will see the best mechanics prepping the bikes on axle/bottom bracket stands. These can withstand the more aggressive tightening and wrenching of bolts that professional riders need to do, however, they usually require you to remove a wheel in order to do your work.

A perfect example of the value of a bike stand comes when trying to do a routine gear check. You perform this by shifting the gears and spinning the wheels to make sure they are responding appropriately. If you try and do this without a stand, it can be nearly impossible to do by yourself. It's also much safer to test your wheel-to-gear responsiveness on your work stand than in real life when riding.

Extra Features To Consider

If your bicycle is your main mode of transportation, then you need a repair stand that is portable. Look for one that is light, foldable, and has some method of attaching directly to your bicycle when not in use, so you don’t need to put it in a backpack. If your stand does attach to your bike, make sure it isn’t too bulky and that it won't interfere with your ability to do your best pedaling.

Permanent repair stands have their own benefits, for example, since they bolt to the ground, they can handle almost any repairs you need to perform without wobbling or tipping over. Some cyclists like to have both a permanent and portable stand, so they’re never limited on the type of work they can do on their ride.

Models with tool trays are especially convenient, letting you keep the items you need within arm's reach and at a comfortable height while you work. If you plan on doing the most complex repairs yourself – like bleeding hydraulic breaks – look for a model that lets you adjust the angle of the clamp. Stands that swivel can also be extremely useful because they allow you to position the bike parts in the best alignment with your body for a comfortable working position. This also allows you to stay stationary as opposed to moving around the bike as you work.

To ensure your repair stand doesn't cause damage to your bike, find one with padded clamps that won’t scratch the paint job on your tubing. Quick release clamps are also useful because when you’re ready to ride again, they allow you to get your bike out of the stand in one easy motion, rather than strenuously loosening the clamp’s grip bit by bit.

The Most Famous Bicycle Mechanics

When people think of Orville and Wilbur Wright (aka the Wright Brothers) they usually think of the men who created the first successful airplane. But these famous inventors found their way to air travel through ground transportation. In fact, it was this duo's work on bicycles that gave them the idea that an unstable mode of transportation like the airplane could work with proper balance.

In the late 1800s, not long after both brothers failed to receive a high school diploma, the Wrights decided to profit from America’s newfound love of bicycles and opened their bicycle repair shop the Wright Cycle Exchange (later the Wright Cycle Company). As a byproduct of working extensively on bicycles, the young inventors noticed how, when a cyclist wants to turn, he leans into the turn – similar to how a bird does when it wants to adjust its flight pattern. This observation gave them the idea that their primitive model of an airplane could recover from a gust of wind if it tilted to the opposite side.

When the brothers built and maintained their airplane, they would mount it on contraptions they made in their shop that were akin to bicycle repair stands we use today. This is why some bicycle enthusiasts and historians credit the pair for inventing the first bicycle repair stand.



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Last updated on August 04, 2017 by Brett Dvoretz

A wandering writer who spends as much time on the road as behind the computer screen, Brett can either be found hacking furiously away at the keyboard or perhaps enjoying a whiskey and coke on some exotic beach, sometimes both simultaneously, usually with a four-legged companion by his side. He hopes to one day become a modern day renaissance man.


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