5 Fascinating & Informative Resources For Astronomy Enthusiasts

From the moment the first civilizations looked to the sky, space has ignited our imaginations and fueled our collective drive toward scientific knowledge and exploration. Even in the 21st century, so much about the universe is yet to be understood, making the prospect of discovery all the more exciting. The resources listed here, ranging from global cosmic projects to local events, are perfect for anyone fascinated by the stars. When you click links from this website, we may receive advertising revenue to support our research. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

5 Inspiring Astronomy Resources

Name Description
The Dark Energy Survey An international, collaborative effort to map hundreds of millions of galaxies, detect thousands of supernovae, and find patterns of cosmic structure that will reveal the nature of the mysterious dark energy that is accelerating the expansion of the universe
Sedona Stargazing Offers a stargazing tour guided by professional astronomers, using some of the largest state-of-the-art portable telescopes and high-powered laser pointers to guide participants around the night sky
SYSTEM Sounds Sci-art outreach project that translates the rhythm and harmony of the cosmos into music and sound via videos, interactive apps, and public exhibits
Astronomy on Tap A series of free events held around the world featuring accessible, engaging science presentations made by scholars from local research and educational institutions
North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves NSF-funded Physics Frontiers Center using pulsars to search for low-frequency gravitational waves

Studying the Southern Sky With the Dark Energy Survey

9 Must-Read Books For People Who Love Space

Title Author Type More by the Author
1. See You in the Cosmos Jack Cheng Novel These Days
2. Endurance Scott Kelly Memoir My Journey to the Stars
3. The Space Between the Stars Anne Corlett Novel Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology: Vol 6
4. Rogue One Alexander Freed Film Novelization Alphabet Squadron
5. Rise of the Rocket Girls Nathalia Holt Nonfiction Cured
6. Conservation of Shadows Yoon Ha Lee Short Stories Ninefox Gambit
7. Spindrift Allen Steele Novel Galaxy Blues
8. The Comet Seekers Helen Sedgwick Novel The Growing Season
9. Rocket Men Robert Kurson Nonfiction Shadow Divers

10 Great Space Films

  1. Hidden Figures (2016)
  2. First Man (2018)
  3. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
  4. Alien (1979)
  5. Contact (1997)
  6. Apollo 13 (1995)
  7. Interstellar (2014)
  8. Ad Astra (2019)
  9. October Sky (1999)
  10. Moon (2009)

10 Astronomical Events That Will Happen In Your Lifetime

In Depth

With so much unknown about our galaxy and the ones surrounding it, space truly is the final frontier. It's no wonder, then, that so many devote their lives trying to get closer to the planets and stars in the sky. This list, presented in no particular order, shares some special organizations and activities for those interested in the cosmos.

At #1, we have The Dark Energy Survey. It is an international, collaborative effort to map galaxies, detect supernovae, and find patterns of cosmic structure that hopefully reveal the nature of dark energy that accelerates the expansion of the Milky Way. The organization surveyed a 5,000 square degree area in Chile for over 500 nights, recording information on over 300 million galaxies.

The organization names a "Scientist of the Week," and previously has featured academics like Rob Morgan of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Niall MacCrann of Ohio State, and Ben Moews of the University of Edinburgh. Members of the Dark Energy Survey present the research to the public throughout the year, at museums, schools, and elsewhere.

Members of the Dark Energy Survey present the research to the public throughout the year, at museums, schools, and elsewhere.

Coming in at #2, we have Sedona Stargazing, a tour company located in the eponymous city in Arizona. Visitors can enjoy an overview of the night sky's constellations, led by a professional astronomer using a high power laser pointer. The guide will explain how ancient civilizations named the constellations and how they were used.

Tourists will also get a close view of a minimum of six celestial objects through a telescope. Tours are operated year-round and come with chairs, blankets, and adult-sized parka jackets in case the temperature drops. The company was listed by TripAdvisor as one of the top space-based attractions in the United States.

The #3 entry is System Sounds, a team of individuals converting the rhythm and harmony of the cosmos into music and other audio tracks. Visitors to the group's website can sync videos of the universe with the unique music generated by space itself. Calm, an app intended to aid meditation and sleep, includes a song written by the solar system composers.

Visitors to the group's website can sync videos of the universe with the unique music generated by space itself.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, NASA asked System Sounds to convert the enormous catalog of science data into audio. The group has been featured in the New York Times, and one member, Matt Russo, presented a Ted Talk called "What does the universe sound like? A musical tour."

Up next, at #4, we present Astronomy on Tap. It is a series of accessible, engaging science presentations, held at bars, on topics ranging from black holes to the beginning of the Universe. The series was started in New York City by Meg Schwamb, a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, in Taiwan, but is now organized by Emily Rice, an astronomer and professor at the College of Staten Island.

All lectures are hosted by academics from local institutions such as NYU, Princeton, Yale, and Rutgers. Astronomy on Tap "satellite" locations are active in Austin, Seattle, New Haven, Ann Arbor, Palo Alto, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Most events have games and prizes to test and reward participants' new-found knowledge.

Most events have games and prizes to test and reward participants' new-found knowledge.

Last but not least, at #5, we have the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. It is a collaboration of scientists in the United States and Canada trying to detect low-frequency gravitational waves and characterize these findings in order to probe galaxy evolution over cosmic time. It primarily uses the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory for this work.

The team is made up of researchers and academics at various levels of career; some are post-docs, some are undergraduates, and others are currently teaching in this field. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves posts various videos, talks, and educational lessons on its YouTube channel, and does other in-person outreach to share its findings.