5 Memorable Places To Eat And Drink In Canada

If you're taking a trip up north, don't just stick close to your hotel when it's time for dinner. If you venture out, you'll find that the Canadian food scene is full of globally-influenced bars and restaurants with innovative fare that just may be the highlight of your trip. These establishments are worth going out of your way to visit, no matter how much bad weather you have to brave to get to them. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

5 Canadian Spots for Food & Drink

Name Location
Minami Restaurant Vancouver, BC
The Bite House Forks Baddeck, NS
Pullman Bar à Vin Montreal, QC
Kinton Ramen Toronto, ON
FIKA Cafe Toronto, ON

The Mega Shoyu Ramen at Kinton Ramen

Gift Ideas for Wine Lovers

Interview with Bryan Picard of The Bite House

In Depth

There's more to Canadian cuisine than maple syrup, poutine, and Tim Horton's. From Vancouver to Halifax, the dining and drinking scene in the Great White North will get you spending your loonies and toonies with abandon. Here, in no particular order, are several thrilling establishments where you can wine and dine in Canada.

The #1 entry is Minami Restaurant, located in the Yaletown neighborhood of Vancouver. It offers aburi, or "flame-seared" sushi, which is a technique meant to create new textures and flavors in the fish. This dining establishment has a signature Miku sauce made in-house from a secret recipe.

Minami also offers a selection of red meat dishes, and all food can be accompanied by Japanese sake, wine, or a specialty cocktail. Owner Seigo Nakamura operates eight restaurants in southern Japan, and has another Vancouver restaurant called Miku, located downtown. Nakamura was drawn to Vancouver's reputation for multicultural cuisine and healthy living.

Minami also offers a selection of red meat dishes, and all food can be accompanied by Japanese sake, wine, or a specialty cocktail.

Up next, at #2, we have The Bite House in Nova Scotia. It is a 12-seat restaurant located in a century-old farmhouse on Cape Breton Island. Its food is prepared with local ingredients sourced from small independent farmers, foraged, or grown in its gardens. Dinner is a set menu of nine courses.

Diners can enjoy a selection of wine, beer, cider, spirits, and juices to pair with their meal. The restaurant has been featured in Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Viceland, Bloomberg, and The Guardian. The eatery offers catering during its off-season of December through April and can accommodate brunches, cookouts, and private dinners.

For #3, we present Pullman, located in downtown Montreal. It is a wine bar with a selection of over 500 bottles of vino, 50 of which can be served by the glass. It also offers cheese plates, raw seafood, and charcuterie platters to enjoy while drinking; sommeliers can guide guests to select specific wine and food pairings.

It is a wine bar with a selection of over 500 bottles of vino, 50 of which can be served by the glass.

Montrealans can order snacks and beverages from the restaurant to be picked up and enjoyed elsewhere, such as at a park. Wine selections include a dry riesling from Nathan Kendall, a white blend from Wabi-Sabi, and a rose from L'ancienne Mercerie. Pullman has been featured in numerous publications, including Time Out.

The #4 entry is Kinton. It opened in 2012 as one of the first Japanese ramen restaurants in Toronto. Its soup base is composed of pig bone and chicken stock, fish broth, vegetables, and filtered water. Kinton uses locally-sourced Canadian pork and marinates it in a unique soy sauce mixture for the ramen.

Kinton offers vegetarian ramen, made with onion, carrots, ginger, and Napa cabbage, and seasoned with Japanese sake. Diners who finish their entire bowl of noodles can collect stamps towards prizes such as free gyoza, a towel, or a t-shirt. Since its flagship eatery opened, the restaurant has expanded with locations in several other Toronto neighborhoods, such as Koreatown and North York.

Since its flagship eatery opened, the restaurant has expanded with locations in several other Toronto neighborhoods, such as Koreatown and North York.

Last up, at #5, we have Fika, a cafe in Toronto's Kensington Market neighborhood. Its name comes from the Swedish verb meaning, "to go out for coffee." It offers several beverage options, such as a cardamom-spiced latte or a lavender-white hot chocolate. The cafe serves cold drinks as well, like its elderflower rosewater lemonade and almond iced tea.

Visitors can order food as well. Fika, which is owned by Yadi Arifin, sells traditional Swedish cinnamon buns, flourless hazelnut praline brownies, and classic ginger snaps. There are also vegan baked goods. The cafe has been featured in Conde Nast Traveler, Walkaboot Travel, The Roasters Pack, and various other media outlets.