6 Authors Who Write Wickedly Funny Books

From hilarious picture books for kids to macabre works sprinkled with dark humor, comedic writing comes in many different forms. The authors listed here have different styles and specialties, but they all have a great sense of humor that influences their work. If you're looking for a good laugh, either for yourself or your kids, consider adding some of their works to your shelf. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Writers With Great Senses Of Humor

Name Notable Works
Adam Ruben Surviving Your Stupid Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School Pinball Wizards
Marcy Dermansky Very Nice The Red Car
Jory John The Bad Seed Goodnight Already!
A.B. Funkhauser Heuer Lost and Found Scooter Nation
Tim Kreider I Wrote This Book Because I Love You We Learn Nothing
Tracey Corderoy Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam The Magical Snow Garden

8 Great Comedic Films:

  1. Airplane! (1980)
  2. Young Frankenstein (1974)
  3. Mean Girls (2004)
  4. Ghostbusters (1984)
  5. Legally Blonde (2001)
  6. The Big Lebowski (1998)
  7. Men in Black (1997)
  8. The Jerk (1979)

Why Do We Laugh?

How to Encourage Kids to Read

A great way to start is to get a bookshelf for your child's room. If they have access to their own collection of books, it'll be easy for them to read at their own pace. And if they're looking at the shelf everyday, reading will always be on their mind. It's also important to give your kids a comfortable place to sit. This can be anything from a rocking chair to a couch to a dedicated reading nook. If they have a space that's just for them, it makes reading time all the more special. As they grow, your young ones will start to read more challenging books with words they don't know. Encourage them to look up unfamiliar terms in the dictionary so they can expand their vocabulary. Finally, if you're having trouble getting your kid interested in books in the first place, try bridging the gap between visual media and literature with graphic novels.

Why We Should Read Aloud to Children

In Depth

Literature comes in all forms, from tragic romances to innovative fantasies and illuminating nonfiction. Books like these can be incredibly enriching, but there's also something to be said for literature that has the ability to make readers laugh out loud. Writing in styles ranging from the caustic to the lighthearted, and with focuses on both adults and children, here are, in no particular order, six authors who pen delightfully funny books.

Showing up at #1 is Adam Ruben. A comedian, teacher, and molecular biologist as well as a humor writer, Ruben is the author of "Surviving Your Stupid, Stupid Decision to Go to Grad School," a sardonic guide for navigating the worst parts of grad student life. He later released "Pinball Wizards," which recounts the colorful American legacy of the classic arcade game, while also charting his own irreverent journey to become a pinball master.

Ruben extends his comedic, academically-inclined writing to his humor column "Experimental Error," which is published in the journal "Science." Additionally, he has performed at nationwide colleges, clubs, and private venues, produced a web series, and appeared on educational television programs such as "Outrageous Acts of Science" and "What on Earth?" Ruben also teaches an undergraduate stand-up comedy class at Johns Hopkins University, and stages solo shows for anti-bullying programs.

Ruben also teaches an undergraduate stand-up comedy class at Johns Hopkins University, and stages solo shows for anti-bullying programs.

For #2 we have Marcy Dermansky, whose books are marked by dark humor, frank sexuality, and wry observations about everything from pretentious MFA programs to adolescent angst. Her first novel, "Twins," taps into the latter theme, as it tells the candid story of identical twin sisters and their often misbegotten teenage escapades. Even more subversive was her follow-up, "Bad Marie," about the travails of a lawless female ex-convict who runs off with her childhood friend's husband and baby.

Other books by Dermansky include "The Red Car," about a woman's surreal and erotic quest for self-actualization in San Francisco, and "Very Nice," which chronicles a twisted love triangle between a creative writing professor, his female student, and the student's wealthy divorcee mother. Besides her novels, Dermansky also pens short stories, many of which have appeared in publications such as "Guernica" and "The Indiana Review."

Landing at #3 is Jory John, a "New York Times"-bestselling author who writes for both adults and children. His work encompasses numerous picture books, many of which center on the whimsical and witty experiences of animals and monsters. In "Penguin Problems" and "Giraffe Problems," both illustrated by Lane Smith, the titular creatures narrate their many grievances with the lives they lead. Similarly droll is the "Goodnight Already!" series, about the adventures of best friends Bear and Duck.

His work encompasses numerous picture books, many of which center on the whimsical and witty experiences of animals and monsters.

John's clever storytelling continues in "I Will Chomp You!," in which a blue monster desperately implores readers not to turn the page. Equally smart are the bestselling picture books "The Bad Seed" and "The Good Egg," and the co-authored middle-grade series "The Terrible Two." John also writes picture books infused with a more adult edge, such as "All my friends are dead" and its sequel, "All my friends are still dead," which comprise the existential ruminations of dinosaurs, zombies, and various other living and inanimate things.

For #4 we come to A.B. Funkhauser. Based in Ontario, Canada, Funkhauser is a funeral director whose writing is largely influenced by the gonzo style of Hunter S. Thompson. She found her literary calling in 2010 while working at a funeral home, and subsequently released her debut novel, "Heuer Lost and Found." The first in the author's "Unapologetic Lives" series, the morbidly funny book focuses on a deceased, disreputable lawyer who attempts to move on to the afterlife with the help of his mortician ex-girlfriend.

Funkhauser's "Unapologetic Lives" series proceeded with "Scooter Nation," which follows two embattled funeral directors as they take on a neighborhood gang, oppressive city laws, and a loathsome adversary. This was followed by the highly tongue-in-cheek "Shell Game," about a black cat whose peaceful nomadic life is disrupted by the machinations of both animal control and a fetishistic feline cult. In addition to these and other novels, Funkhauser has written a number of short fictions inspired by her character Jurgen Heuer.

In addition to these and other novels, Funkhauser has written a number of short fictions inspired by her character Jurgen Heuer.

At #5 is Tim Kreider, an essayist and satirical cartoonist who penned the collections "We Learn Nothing" and "I Wrote This Book Because I Love You." In the former, he uses his candor and mordant humor to ponder the follies of human nature. The latter work, meanwhile, is a self-deprecating account of his various relationships with women, as well as his attachment to his nineteen-year-old cat. Kreider's perceptive, philosophical style has earned comparison to writers such as David Sedaris and E.B. White.

On top of his essay collections, Kreider writes a regular column for the website Medium, and has contributed to publications including "The New York Times" and "Men's Journal." His cartoons have appeared in "The Comics Journal" as well as his collection "Why Do They Kill Me?," which takes uncompromising aim at the horrors of the Bush-Cheney administration. One of his most famous comics, "The Pain: When Will It End?," ran for twelve years in alternative weeklies such as "Baltimore City Paper."

Finally, for #6 we get Tracey Corderoy. Originally from South Wales, Corderoy studied in Bath, England to become a primary school teacher. While implementing literacy programs and re-integrating sick students back into school, she developed a passion for writing children's books. This resulted in a prolific collection of picture books, first readers, and young fiction, all of which are fueled by the author's belief in the power of literature to spark the imagination.

This resulted in a prolific collection of picture books, first readers, and young fiction, all of which are fueled by the author's belief in the power of literature to spark the imagination.

Featuring colorful illustrations, Corderoy's picture books employ vibrant humor to demonstrate timeless themes of friendship, family, acceptance, and patience. Among her works are the toddler books "No!," "Why?," and "More!," which follow a curious and stubborn little rhino named Archie. Other works focus on baby bears, princesses, magical grandmas, and the Christmas holidays. Corderoy is also responsible for a number of series including "Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam," about a pair of doggy robbers turned bakers, and "The Grunt and the Grouch," which centers on two misbehaving trolls.