6 Museums And Experiences In Massachusetts That Are Great For Kids

If you have kids in your life, you're probably always on the lookout for activities that are not just fun, but have educational or cultural value. Luckily for families in Massachusetts, there are plenty of museums and experiences in The Bay State that children are sure to enjoy. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Great Places To Take Kids In Massachusetts

Organization Location Mission
Worcester Art Museum Worcester Connect people, communities, and cultures through the experience of art
Boston Children's Museum Boston Engage children and families in joyful discovery experiences that instill an appreciation of our world, develop foundational skills, and spark a lifelong love of learning
EcoTarium Worcester Inspire a passion for science and nature
Cape Ann Museum Gloucester Foster an appreciation of the quality and diversity of life on Cape Ann, collect and preserve significant artifacts, and encourage community involvement
House of the Seven Gables Salem Be a welcoming, thriving, historic site and community resource that engages people of all backgrounds in an inclusive American story
Edward M. Kennedy Institute Boston Educate the public about the important role of the Senate in U.S. government, encourage participatory democracy, invigorate civic discourse, and inspire the next generation

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In Depth

Museums play an important role in preserving local history and culture, and a lot of them offer programs that let people learn more about and even experience what life was like in the past. These non-profit organizations also serve as settings for informal learning, often incorporating interactive activities into their exhibits that encourage critical thinking and stimulate one's creativity. With that in mind, here, in no particular order, are six museums and experiences in Massachusetts that are great for kids.

First up, at #1, is the Worcester Art Museum, which was founded in 1896. With a wide and growing collection of objects dating all the way back to 3000 B.C., it aims to connect people of all ages through engaging exhibits and in-gallery teaching that ensure guests get to experience art and cultures from all around the world.

At certain days of each month, it offers public tours that come free with admission, with some specifically designed for families with young children. Aside from these, the Worcester Art Museum also hosts classes and several events targeted towards kids, such as Youth Art Month, an annual exhibition that emphasizes the importance of art education. Those who wish to support it financially may make either a one-time or recurring donation through its website.

Those who wish to support it financially may make either a one-time or recurring donation through its website.

Next, at #2, is the Boston Children's Museum. Founded in 1913, it's the second oldest kids' museum and one of the largest of its kind in the world. Its mission is to help children learn more about the world around them and develop their foundational skills through fun and engaging hands-on activities designed to spark joy and curiosity.

Working closely with researchers, the Boston Children's Museum develops exhibits and programs that provide experiences that stimulate children's creativity and promote play-based activities that teach kids about a multitude of topics, including, but not limited to, music, global cultures, science, and technology. It relies on generous patrons and fundraising events to keep its operations running, and those looking to help may contribute directly to their Annual Fund online.

Taking the #3 spot is the EcoTarium. Based in the city of Worcester, it offers an accessible learning environment that encourages visitors to explore and discover the wonders of science and nature. Aside from having three floors full of interactive exhibits, it boasts a wide collection of living animals kept in enclosures designed to mimic their natural habitats. Many of its animal inhabitants are kept there due to certain conditions which make them unfit for release, such as injury or illness.

Aside from having three floors full of interactive exhibits, it boasts a wide collection of living animals kept in enclosures designed to mimic their natural habitats.

Formerly known as the New England Science Center, the EcoTarium focuses on bringing nature education to children through immersive indoor and outdoor experiences, learning programs, and summer camps. Individuals who wish to help it continue serving kids and in-need families throughout the region may make generous donations through its website or sign up as volunteers who assist in the day-to-day operations of the museum.

At #4 is the Cape Ann Museum. Founded in 1873, the former Cape Ann Scientific and Literary Association is a cultural center that showcases both significant historical pieces and contemporary works created by modern artists. One of its most notable attractions is its large collection of paintings by Fitz Henry Lane, a prominent 19th-century marine artist and Massachusetts native.

The museum, which offers free admission to kids under the age of 18, shines a spotlight on the history and culture of the region through its permanent collections and various educational programs, which also include lectures and workshops geared toward younger audiences. If you're looking to support its mission to preserve the story of Cape Ann, you may go online and purchase a membership for yourself or a friend.

The museum, which offers free admission to kids under the age of 18, shines a spotlight on the history and culture of the region through its permanent collections and various educational programs, which also include lectures and workshops geared toward younger audiences.

Next up, at #5, is The House of the Seven Gables, which is best known as the setting of author Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel of the same name. Originally built in 1668, this mansion was bought by philanthropist Caroline Emmerton in 1908, who then hired architect Joseph Everett Chandler to restore it to its original appearance. A few years later, Emmerton opened it as a museum and founded The House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association, using the proceeds to support her community work.

Since then, the organization continues to preserve this historic site and helps the community by hosting enrichment programs, ESL and citizenship classes, and dialogues that address the topic of immigration. It depends on revenue from visitors to sustain itself, and those who wish to help may send a gift through mail or their online system.

Finally, at #6, we have the Edward M. Kennedy Institute, a nonpartisan organization that emphasizes the importance of the Senate and encourages people of all ages to engage in civil discourse and debate about current social issues. Inside the Institute's walls is a variety of interactive exhibits that aim to teach guests about the rich history of the U.S. Senate and the works of Senator Kennedy and his staff.

Inside the Institute's walls is a variety of interactive exhibits that aim to teach guests about the rich history of the U.S. Senate and the works of Senator Kennedy and his staff.

The Institute's educational experiences involve immersive simulations that make use of their full-scale replica of the U.S. Senate Chamber. It offers programs that introduce kids to the legislative process and have them participate in activities as "Senators-in-Training." The organization relies on generous contributions to continue inspiring people to make a difference in their communities, and those who want to help in non-monetary ways may also apply as volunteers.