6 Stimulating Cultural Destinations in Ohio

You don't have to leave your state, or even your hometown, to be exposed to exquisite art, nature, and history. If you live in Ohio, or happen to be passing through, these cultural institutions can connect you to the rich heritage of this place and all that it has to offer. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

6 Rewarding Places to Visit in Ohio

Attraction Location Features
Sauder Village Archbold Historic village with artisans and craftsmen, train and buggy rides, costumed guides, museum exhibits, a campground, classes, and more
Cleveland Botanical Garden Cleveland Indoor and outdoor haven for plant lovers, including hundreds of species from around the world, and hands-on programs for kids and adults
Findlay Market Cincinnati Outdoor farmers market, indoor merchants offering food and flowers, a holiday market, Biergarten, and Findlay Kitchen, supporting entrepreneurs of local food businesses
International Women's Air & Space Museum Cleveland Preserves artifacts and records related to the contributions of women in the fields of aviation and aerospace, with exhibits, speakers, tours, and programs for kids
USS Cod Submarine Memorial Cleveland Restored World War II-era submarine available for tours and field trips, and hosting special events commemorating history throughout the year
Playhouse Square Cleveland Performances of musicals, kids' shows, comedians, magicians, and touring musicians at multiple theaters, as well as educational programs and camps

Living History at Sauder Village

Famous Americans from Ohio

The Magic of Theater at Playhouse Square

Where Were The Wright Brothers From?

Because of the fame they garnered from their historic 1903 flight, several states have laid claim to Orville and Wilbur Wright. Wilbur was born in Indiana in 1867, while Orville was born in Dayton, Ohio, where both eventually died. And of course, Kitty Hawk, North Carolina was the site of their famous flight. The result is that one could answer the question with Indiana, Ohio, or North Carolina, depending on where you're from. And of course, there are others who claimed to have flown before the Wright brothers, but no matter what, Orville and Wilbur will go down in history as pioneers of human flight.

In Depth

Wedged between Pennsylvania and Indiana, the Buckeye State has a rich past and a vibrant present. With Lake Erie to its north and the Ohio River flowing near its southern border, this Midwestern state possesses impressive natural beauty. This, coupled with a diverse range of noteworthy attractions, brings millions of visitors each year. If you are interested in learning more about these offerings, then here are, in no particular order, six stimulating cultural destinations in Ohio.

Coming in at #1 is Sauder Village. Built in 1976 by founder Erie Sauder, this living history village in Archbold commemorates the innovative spirit of the state's ancestors. The largest such destination in Ohio, the Sauder Village complex boasts 235 acres, including a farm and craft village, an inn, a campground, a restaurant, and a hall for banquets. Each year, more than 330,000 guests visit the site.

Sauder Village houses a number of historic buildings of interest, like St. Mark's Lutheran Church, with a century-old pump organ, and the W.O. Taylor Printing Office, with a working hand press and a large newspaper press. Elsewhere, the Museum Building educates visitors on the destination's founder and displays a collection of artifacts from earlier times. It also runs a series of special events and classes, teaching skills in areas such as weaving, blacksmithing, and spinning. Those who wish to support Sauder Village can purchase items from one of its many shops or sign up to volunteer.

It also runs a series of special events and classes, teaching skills in areas such as weaving, blacksmithing, and spinning.

In the #2 spot is Cleveland Botanical Garden. Founded in 1930, this not-for-profit organization is an urban oasis offering more than nine acres of outdoor gardens and an indoor glasshouse of over 17,000 square feet. With a mission to encourage a deeper understanding of plants and to enhance human life, Cleveland Botanical Garden also boasts a cafe and a store where visitors can purchase food, apparel, jewelry, and decor.

In The Eleanor Armstrong Smith Glasshouse, visitors have the opportunity to view 350 species of exotic plants, from both the rainforests of Costa Rica and the deserts of Madagascar. This destination also provides educational opportunities for people of all different ages, from plant science classes for children to professional development for teachers. If you are interested in getting involved with Cleveland Botanical Garden, you can sign up as an official member or join one of its affiliate garden clubs.

At #3 is Findlay Market, located in Cincinnati. The oldest continuously operated public market in the state, it provides space to over forty indoor vendors selling a variety of items, such as meat, flowers, and cheese, and a busy farmers market outdoors in the warmer months. It also features street performers and special events, and each year more than a million people visit Findlay Market.

The oldest continuously operated public market in the state, it provides space to over forty indoor vendors selling a variety of items, such as meat, flowers, and cheese, and a busy farmers market outdoors in the warmer months.

Beyond providing a place to purchase local food and artisan products, Findlay Market aims to serve as a dynamic gathering place for the public and a community asset. Accordingly, it is committed to a number of key principles, including environmental sustainability, market district development, and economic development. In particular, it supports local food entrepreneurs through Findlay Kitchen, a business incubator launched in 2016. If you wish to get involved with this institution, consider making a donation or becoming a volunteer.

Coming in at #4 is the International Women's Air & Space Museum. This organization seeks to gather and preserve artifacts, memorabilia, and other historical records that display the contributions that women have made to the fields of aviation and aerospace. By educating individuals in these areas, it hopes to inspire future generations. First opened in 1986 in Centerville, I.W.A.S.M. today is located in the Burke Lakefront Airport in Cleveland.

With exhibits in the lobby and west concourse at Burke, the International Women's Air & Space Museum is open to the public. Featuring several exhibits, both temporary and permanent, I.W.A.S.M. displays information on women who have made an impact on air and space, such as Amelia Earhart, Ruth Nichols, Bessie Coleman, and Harriet Quimby. It also offers group tours and can provide speakers for talks at outside locations. Those who are interested in supporting this museum can participate in one of its events or raffles, look into internship opportunities, or shop at its online store.

Featuring several exhibits, both temporary and permanent, I.W.A.S.M. displays information on women who have made an impact on air and space, such as Amelia Earhart, Ruth Nichols, Bessie Coleman, and Harriet Quimby.

In the #5 spot is the USS Cod Submarine Memorial. Located in Cleveland, this National Historic Landmark is named after the world's most important food fish and saw action during World War II in the Pacific. Most notably, it carried out the only international submarine-to-submarine rescue in history, transporting fifty-six Dutch sailors to safety. In May of 1976, this floating memorial, docked in Lake Erie, opened to the public.

At 312 feet and 1,525 tons, the USS Cod provides ample room for visitors to explore its interior, and is the only American submarine that has not had stairways and doors cut into her pressure hull for public access. It welcomes visitors May through September, and group tours with guides can also be arranged. In addition, it sometimes holds special functions, with past ones celebrating holidays and commemorating historical events. If you want to support the USS Cod Submarine Memorial, consider making a donation to contribute to its restoration and maintenance.

Finally, at #6 is Playhouse Square, a collection of theaters coupled with a real estate services division located in Cleveland. This performing arts center, the largest one in the nation outside of New York, hosts and produces many entertaining acts, including plays, musicals, concerts, and variety shows. Through its programming and educational efforts, it strives to solidify the downtown area as a bona fide cultural destination. With roots going back to the 1920s, this not-for-profit organization was incorporated in 1973.

Through its programming and educational efforts, it strives to solidify the downtown area as a bona fide cultural destination.

In addition to the numerous shows it puts on, which attract more than a million people each year, Playhouse Square also engages in community education. Its Broadway Summer Camp, for example, offers teens an intensive week of singing, acting, and dancing, while Classroom Connections Workshops provide students the chance to learn from Playhouse Square's teaching artists. If you are interested in getting involved with this organization, you can sign up to volunteer, make a donation, or even rent one of its spaces.