12 Amazing Fantasy Novels For Young Readers

By
Sat, 1 Dec 2018

Getting children interested in reading isn't always easy. But with books full of daring adventures, imaginary creatures, and real magic, you should have no problem getting your little one hooked on the literary world. The twelve fantasy novels listed here are a great way to introduce your children to a well-loved genre. When you click links from this website, we may receive advertising revenue to support our research. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

12 Amazing Fantasy Novels For Young Readers

Title Author More by the Author
1. Miss Ellicott's School for the Magically Minded Sage Blackwood Jinx Jinx's Magic
2. The Explorers Adrienne Kress The Reckless Rescue The Friday Society
3. The House of Months and Years Emma Trevayne Spindrift and the Orchid The Accidental Afterlife of Thomas Marsden
4. Circus Mirandus Cassie Beasley Tumble & Blue
5. Isle of Winds James Fahy The Drowned Tomb Chains of Gaia
6. Horten's Miraculous Mechanisms Lissa Evans Old Baggage Crooked Heart
7. Bayou Magic Jewell Parker Rhodes Ninth Ward Sugar
8. Out of the Wild Night Blue Balliett Chasing Vermeer The Wright 3
9. The Polar Bear Explorers' Club Alex Bell Explorers on Witch Mountain Frozen Charlotte
10. York Laura Ruby Bone Gap Bad Apple
11. The Blackthorn Key Kevin Sands Mark of the Plague The Assassin's Curse
12. Orphan Island Laurel Snyder Swan Charlie & Mouse

What is Fantasy?

Fantasy is a genre of fiction that often involves supernatural elements like magic and usually takes place in a fictional universe that is significantly different from reality. Many people group fantasy and science fiction together, but while both are forms of speculative fiction, they are distinct from one another. While sci-fi often attempts to stay grounded in scientific truths, fantasy relies more on imagination and suspension of disbelief. Fantasy's origins are rooted in oral traditions which were eventually written down into books. In modern times, fantasy has expanded into several media, including television, film, and video & tabletop games. The genre is especially popular in children's entertainment and can be found everywhere from Grimm fairy tales to Disney movies.

Common Fantasy Tropes

The possibilities in this genre are endless, and no two authors create exactly the same world. Still, there are several common tropes that writers love to come back to again and again, sometimes adding their own unique twists. Here are a few beloved fantasy staples:

6 Great Fantasy Movies Kids Will Love

  1. The Wizard of Oz (1939)
  2. Labyrinth (1986)
  3. The NeverEnding Story (1984)
  4. Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)
  5. Matilda (1996)
  6. Coraline (2009)

Literary Charities

If you want to spread your love of reading with those in need, then you should consider looking into these non-profit organizations that help kids and teens get access to books and high-quality education.

The Power of Reading

In Depth

Fantasy novels take us to all sorts of worlds full of whimsical creatures and awe-inspiring locations. It's a genre that helps stimulate one's imagination, and it can be used to teach readers of all ages valuable life lessons and morals. With that in mind, we've compiled a list of twelve amazing fantasy novels for young readers. Take note that this list is done in no particular order.

First up, at #1, we have "Miss Ellicott's School for the Magically Minded" by Sage Blackwood. It revolves around Chantel, a young prodigy studying at the eponymous school for magical maidens. There, girls are taught how to properly conduct themselves and uphold their duties as sorceresses of the walled city of Lightning Pass. When the sorceresses that protect the city suddenly disappear, it's up to Chantel to save Lightning Pass from both their enemies outside and the patriarchs who rule over them.

At #2 is "The Door in the Alley" by Adrienne Kress. It's the first entry of her "The Explorers" series, and it revolves around two kids, Sebastian and Evie, who both get involved with the mysterious Explorers Society for different reasons. The story follows them as they go on an adventure to search for a missing key and rescue Evie's grandfather, who used to be a member of the secret society.

The story follows them as they go on an adventure to search for a missing key and rescue Evie's grandfather, who used to be a member of the secret society.

Next up, at #3, we have "The House of Months and Years" by Emma Trevayne. When Amelia Howling's family is forced to move into her recently deceased aunt and uncle's home, she meets a time-traveling creature named Horatio. After spending some time with Horatio, Amelia realizes that he's been taking advantage of her emotions to steal memories from her cousins, and now she has to find a way to stop him.

Next, at #4, is "Circus Mirandus" by Cassie Beasley. Micah Tuttle is a young boy whose grandfather, Ephraim, constantly tells him tales about the Circus Mirandus, which only appears to people who believe in magic. When his grandfather falls ill, Micah and his friend Jenny go on a quest to find the Lightbender, one of the Circus' magical performers who owes Ephraim a miracle.

At #5 is "Isle of Winds." Written by James Fahy, it's the first book of his "The Changeling" series. It revolves around a twelve-year-old boy named Robin, an orphan who's sent to live at Erlking Hall with his great-aunt after his grandmother dies. While staying at his great-aunt's estate, he finds out that he is the last changeling alive. After discovering the magical realm known as the Netherworlde, he's suddenly thrust into conflict as he tries to help the Fae overthrow the evil tyrant, Lady Eris.

While staying at his great-aunt's estate, he finds out that he is the last changeling alive.

At #6 is "Horten's Miraculous Mechanisms" by Lissa Evans. After moving to his father's hometown of Beeton, 10-year-old Stuart Horten discovers a strange puzzle box owned by his great-uncle Tony Horton, a famous magician who mysteriously disappeared several years ago. With the help of his nosy next-door neighbors and a series of cryptic clues left behind by his uncle, he tries to figure out what happened to Tony and his secret workshop.

Next up, at #7, we have "Bayou Magic" by Jewell Parker Rhodes. It's the last book of Rhodes' "The Louisiana Girls" trilogy, and it revolves around Maddy, who's spending the summer with her grandmother at the bayou. When she sees a mermaid, she asks her grandmother about it, who then tells her about their family's history and the story of Mami Wata, an African water spirit. When an oil spill threatens to ruin their surroundings, it's up to Maddy to save the day.

At #8 is "Out of the Wild Night" by Blue Balliett. Nantucket Island is full of ghosts, and the people who live there either ignore or embrace their existence. The ghosts inhabit the historical houses found around the island, and when their homes are destroyed, they disappear forever. When people start buying and renovating the old houses around the island, the spirits of Nantucket enlist the help of some local kids who they believe can convince the adults to preserve their history.

When people start buying and renovating the old houses around the island, the spirits of Nantucket enlist the help of some local kids who they believe can convince the adults to preserve their history.

Next, at #9, is "The Polar Bear Explorers' Club." Written by Alex Bell, it's the first entry of her eponymous series, and it revolves around Stella, an orphan who was found in the Icelands and adopted by an explorer named Felix. When she goes on an expedition with her father, she and a small group of people are separated from the others, and now they have to find their own way out of the magical Icelands. Along the way, Stella learns more about her mysterious past.

Next up, at #10, we have "The Shadow Cipher." It's the first book of Laura Ruby's "York" series, and it's set in an alternate and much more technically-advanced version of New York City. When the Morningstarr twins, the architects responsible for the city's development, disappeared, they left behind a puzzle that promised treasure to whoever can solve it.

Tess and Theo Biedermann live in a Morningstarr building, and when a real estate developer threatens to destroy it, the only way they can save their home is by proving that the twins' old cipher, which nobody has ever solved, exists.

Tess and Theo Biedermann live in a Morningstarr building, and when a real estate developer threatens to destroy it, the only way they can save their home is by proving that the twins' old cipher, which nobody has ever solved, exists.

At #11 is "The Blackthorn Key" by Kevin Sands. Christopher Rowe is an apprentice apothecary taught by his master, Benedict Blackthorn. When an enigmatic cult starts murdering apothecaries all around London, including his master, Christopher is forced to track down the killers before he ends up being the next victim. It's a fast-paced story with a lot of twists and turns, and it's the first in Sands' eponymous series.

Finally, at #12, we have "Orphan Island" by Laurel Snyder. It's about a mysterious island and the nine children who live there. Every year, a boat arrives to drop off another child and take away the eldest of the group. When Jinny finds herself becoming the next elder, it's up to her to take care of and teach the newcomer, Ess, everything she knows, all while preparing herself for her inevitable departure.