5 Hawaiian Destinations And Events That Are Off The Beaten Path

There's nothing wrong with relaxing at Waikiki Beach or a lūʻau at the resort, but if you're looking to get immersed in Hawaiian culture, we've got you covered. These destinations include places to eat, stay, and visit that might not be on every tourist's list, but are sure to be a memorable part of your trip. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

5 Places to Go and Things to Do On Your Next Trip to Hawaii

Attraction Location
Taste of the Hawaiian Range Waimea, Hawaii
Gannon's Restaurant Wailea, Maui
Ko'a Kea Hotel & Resort Koloa, Kauai
Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Holualoa & Kailua-Kona area, Hawaii
Our Kaka'ako Honolulu, Oahu

Discovering Kauai with Ko'a Kea Hotel & Resort

Things To Bring on Your Hawaiian Vacation

Where Hawaii Ranks As A State

Metric Rank (out of 50 states plus District of Columbia)
Per Capita Personal Income 17
Average Annual Employee Wage 24
Unemployment Rate 1
Poverty Rate 3
Household Income 4
Non-English-speaking Population 4
Health Insurance Coverage 2
Population with Bachelor's Degree 19
Home Ownership 47
Monthly Gross Rent 1

A Glimpse of the Fun at the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival

In Depth

Hawaii is known for its natural beauty, friendly people, and distinct culture and history. There is a plethora of things to do and see in this lush tropical destination that attracts visitors from all over the globe, and it can be hard to know where to begin. So here, listed in no particular order, are some interesting attractions to check out on your next visit to The Aloha State.

Starting off our list at #1, Taste of the Hawaiian Range is an agricultural festival that originated in the Big Island ranching town of Waimea, which is also known as Kamuela. Each year, the festival brings together food producers and processors, chefs and consumers to celebrate the bounty of the Big Island.

The event features a free, daytime, family-friendly celebration where children can meet livestock, pedal their own kid-sized tractor, use tiny farm tools, shovel hay and receive a seed to take home and grow. In the evening, visitors are invited to attend the Taste of the Hawaiian Range Gala. The goal of the festival is to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and foster the engagement with and support of locally produced agricultural products.

The goal of the festival is to provide a venue for sustainable agricultural education and foster the engagement with and support of locally produced agricultural products.

#2 on our list is Gannon's Restaurant. Located in Wailea, this dining destination is celebrated for its regionally-inspired, classic dishes. The menu was created by Chef Beverly Gannon, who is best known as one of the 12 original founders of the Hawaii Regional Cuisine Movement, which champions the concept of using fresh local ingredients rather than importing them from out-of-state.

The restaurant features contemporary cuisine inspired by the fresh, edible bounty that Hawaii has to offer. Guests can dine on the outdoor lanai, which is perfect for enjoying sunset ocean views. Inside, The Red Bar is always a lively gathering spot, with an extended happy hour and musical entertainment on the weekends. Open daily, Gannon's is the perfect spot in Wailea for those looking for something unique and off-the-beaten-tourist-path.

At #3 on our list, Ko'a Kea Hotel & Resort is located on the south shores of Kauai on Po'ipu Beach. Po'ipu, which means "crashing waves" in Hawaiian, is situated on the sunniest part of Kauai. Ko'a Kea offers its guests the closest accommodations to the waterfront on the island. This intimate resort is inspired by the authentic essence of Hawaiian history, culture and hospitality.

Ko'a Kea offers its guests the closest accommodations to the waterfront on the island.

The hotel features 121 oceanfront, ocean view, and garden view guest rooms and suites to choose from. For those seeking relaxation, The Spa at Ko'a Kea offers a variety of treatments that use natural, indigenous ingredients that are dedicated to easing stress. After a day of exploration, guests can dine at the award-winning Red Salt Restaurant, which showcases locally-sourced ingredients and dishes with a modern flare.

At #4, The award-winning Kona Coffee Cultural Festival is a lively event spanning ten days of programming, showcasing Hawaii's unique culture and diversity. This festival's mission is to preserve, perpetuate and promote Kona's unique coffee heritage. The first gathering was held in 1970, making it the longest-running food event of its kind in the Aloha State.

The organizers of the first festival, which was held over a single weekend, wanted to put Kona coffee in the international spotlight and increase the island's visibility as a tourism destination. Now, the event has grown to span 10 days and includes activities such as farm tours, barista training, a talent showcase, coffee-themed art exhibitions and a cupping competition.

The organizers of the first festival, which was held over a single weekend, wanted to put Kona coffee in the international spotlight and increase the island's visibility as a tourism destination.

Lastly, at #5, Our Kaka'ako is a community that encompasses nine city blocks on the Auahi, Keawe and Coral streets. This is an emerging epicenter for Hawaii's urban-island culture, and is an incubator for a variety of artists, chefs, influencers and entrepreneurs. The area is centered around arts and culture, and features a unique selection of retail stores, dining destinations and attractions.

Rooted in Hawaiian cultural values, Our Kaka'ako is founded on empowering creativity, cultivating innovation and building a unique, local community. The area's revitalization has put it on the map as one of Hawaii's most talked-about neighborhoods. This thriving community seeks to facilitate a place for visitors and locals to foster connections that are rooted in education, authenticity and creativity.