5 People & Groups Spreading Interest In Science

Science is a fascinating subject that covers everything from the biology of how our bodies function to the physics of stars and planets light-years away. For some, these concepts can seem too complicated to fully understand, but there are plenty of individuals and organizations making science accessible for people of all ages. Whether you want to find an educational place to take your kids or meet a scientist at a bar, one of the entities on this list should appeal to you. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

Resources For Those Interested In Science

Name Description
Adam Frank Astrophysicist, writer, and speaker who promotes science literacy
Science Mill All-ages interactive attraction in Johnson City, Texas that gets kids interested in STEM
Science Venture Program at the University of Victoria that teaches children and teens about engineering and science
Andrew May Author who writes about science, popular culture, and fringe beliefs
Pint of Science Canada Non-profit organization that runs events where people can interact with scientists in an informal setting

The Major Branches of Science

  1. Natural Sciences: Include biology, chemistry, & physics
  2. Social Sciences: Include psychology, sociology, & economics
  3. Formal Sciences: Include math, statistics, & computer science

Fun Ways To Get Kids Interested in Science

The History of the Scientific Revolution

In Depth

The scientific method, and the discoveries that it has enabled humankind to make, offers enormous potential for improving our lives and expanding our knowledge of the universe around us. To ensure that this endeavor continues into the future, numerous people and groups strive to provide education, inspiration, and novel perspectives on the subject to the world at large. In no particular order, we present five individuals and organizations working to inform the public and popularize science.

Beginning our list at #1 is Adam Frank, astrophysicist and award-winning promoter of science literacy. A professor at the University of Rochester, he is a noted expert on the end stages of stellar life cycles, where he helped to develop advanced computational tools for examining the formation and destruction of stars. Through his work as a writer and speaker, he also strives to inspire passion for science, and spark interest in the possibilities for humanity's future.

In addition to his academic writings, Frank has authored several books. His first, entitled Light of the Stars, explores the potentials and dangers of human development, illustrated by theories about inhabited alien worlds. Other works include About Time, a discussion of how cosmology relates to everyday understanding of life, and The Constant Fire, a vision of how science and spirituality can work together. He is also the co-founder of National Public Radio's blog about popular conceptions of scientific ideas.

His first, entitled Light of the Stars, explores the potentials and dangers of human development, illustrated by theories about inhabited alien worlds.

Next up, at #2, is the Science Mill, an all-ages attraction for interactive and educational fun. Located in Johnson City, Texas, this learning destination seeks to inspire enthusiasm for science, as well as expanding students' understanding of the role that it plays in shaping their world. With exhibits like Masters of Disguise, which delves into the mechanics of camouflage, and games like Molecular Detective, a puzzle challenge illustrating gene theory, this museum lets the natural curiosity of visitors guide them toward discovery.

The Science Mill welcomes field trips, and visits from home schooling educators, as well as providing an option for bringing their programs into the classroom. The organization aims to promote interest in STEM careers, through various educational workshops and summer camps, which let children experience the joys of innovation firsthand. They also provide scholarships to help low-income families attend, and to support the education of student employees. Those wishing to contribute to the Mill's mission can volunteer, make a donation, or sign up as members.

#3 on the list is the Science Venture program at the University of Victoria, which provides innovative STEM learning programs to the children and teens of Vancouver Island. Led by collegiate volunteers, their interactive workshops take place in classrooms around the region, educating and sparking interest in the process of discovery. Students can also join weekend and afternoon clubs, designed to let them explore specific topics in engineering and science in a fun and supportive setting.

Led by collegiate volunteers, their interactive workshops take place in classrooms around the region, educating and sparking interest in the process of discovery.

Science Venture's educational programs include weekly summer day camps, providing an option for students to continue their learning outside of the school year. Participants carry out lab experiments, learn from working researchers, and exercise their imaginations, all while experiencing a university setting. The organization also strives to encourage wider interest in STEM careers, with special events to spark enthusiasm among women and indigenous populations. They welcome the support of donors and the help of interested volunteers.

Coming in at #4 is Andrew May, a writer who explores a diverse range of topics in relation to science, mysticism, and the controversy around phenomena like UFO sightings. Throughout his lifetime, he has worked as a scientist in both academic and governmental capacities, as well as in private industry. His writings examine ideas that challenge conventional understanding of history and science, taking a skeptical but open-minded approach, combined with a good-humored appreciation for strange beliefs.

Much of May's writing focuses on the way that popular culture, especially pulp novels and comics, both absorbs and originates fringe concepts. His book Pseudoscience and Science Fiction offers a guide to historical examples of this cross-fertilization. Other works discuss the past and future of humanity's efforts to understand the cosmos, or the long history of speculative fiction, paranormal investigation, and other attempts to grapple with outlandish ideas.

Other works discuss the past and future of humanity's efforts to understand the cosmos, or the long history of speculative fiction, paranormal investigation, and other attempts to grapple with outlandish ideas.

We'll close with #5, Pint of Science Canada, a non-profit organization that arranges for eminent scientists to visit local bars, giving the public a chance to talk with leading researchers and theorists in an informal setting. The festival takes place in locations across Canada, part of a larger worldwide program first launched by researchers at Imperial College London. By bringing the conversation to places where people of all walks of life gather, the group hopes to challenge popular misconceptions and spread knowledge.

Staffed and run by scientists and enthusiasts from a variety of disciplines, POS Canada offers a venue for dedicated explorers to share their love of knowledge. Past topics have included artificial intelligence, revolutions in genetics, and primate digestive systems. The organization has also arranged specialty events celebrating the achievements of women in science. Readers interested in supporting this outreach effort can contact the group about volunteering, partnering, or helping to organize an event.