6 Important American Landmarks That Everyone Should See

Whether you're looking for fun family vacation destinations or trying to find a unique place to reconnect with nature, the landmarks featured on this list are sure to fit the bill. From impressive man-made monuments to well-preserved natural wonders, these sites are worth keeping in mind on your next road trip. This video was made with Ezvid Wikimaker.

6 Important American Landmarks That Everyone Should See

Organization Location
The Alamo San Antonio, TX
Pilgrim Monument Provincetown, MA
Cave of the Winds Manitou Springs, CO
Crazy Horse Memorial Custer County, SD
Joshua Tree Twentynine Palms, CA
Cave of the Mounds Blue Mounds, WI

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In Depth

Visiting a National Landmark can be an amazing way to bring history to life, learn more about the planet we live on, or even see the stars. National Landmarks are all over the United States, providing guests fun and educational experiences that they can't get anywhere else. In no particular order, here are six important American Landmarks that everyone should see.

#1 on our list is The Alamo. The Alamo has defined San Antonio, Texas for 300 years, since it first began as a waypoint to help the Spanish settle Eastern Texas. It is most famously known for the 1836 battle that is its namesake. Today, preservation efforts and research are ongoing with archaeologists studying the remaining historical structures.

Guests visiting this site can look forward to various tour options including one hour tours that either explore the heroes and events of the Alamo, or go over the historical weapons used. There are also forty-five minute tours for kids aged five to twelve, and forty five minute audio tours in multiple languages available. All tours are approximately $7 to $15 and must be booked twenty-four hours in advance.

There are also forty-five minute tours for kids aged five to twelve, and forty five minute audio tours in multiple languages available.

Up next at #2 is Pilgrim Monument. Pilgrim Monument was built between 1907 and 1910 to commemorate the first landing of the Mayflower Pilgrims in Provincetown, Massachusetts on November 11th, 1620. The tallest all granite structure in the United States, Pilgrim Monument is over two hundred feet tall. When walking up to the top, you will see different stones donated from cities and towns all over their United States.

The cornerstone was laid by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1907 with the dedication ceremony led by President William H. Taft in 1910. Beginning on each November 11th, there is an Annual Lighting of the Pilgrim Monument to celebrate the landing of the Pilgrims in Provincetown, and set an intention for the coming year. The lights stay lit through the new year and attract visitors from all over. Guests can visit both the Monument and the Provincetown Museum for about $14.

Sliding into #3 is Cave of the Winds. Cave of the Winds, located in Manitou Springs, Colorado, was discovered in 1880 by the Picket Brothers. Excavation began shortly after discovery, enabling guided tours to begin in 1881. Once electricity was installed in 1907, it made for even easier touring, which has never stopped, making this one of Colorado's oldest and most famous attractions.

Once electricity was installed in 1907, it made for even easier touring, which has never stopped, making this one of Colorado's oldest and most famous attractions.

Tours range from a walking tour of the well-lit areas, to lantern tours featuring ghost stories, to a caving 101 class and tour. All tours must be booked in advance and range from about $16 to about $50. Outside of the caves, guests can enjoy Mountain Park which features a variety of other attractions, from ziplining and climbing canyon tours, to themed rides, and many more.

Coming in at #4 is Crazy Horse Memorial. Crazy Horse Memorial is both a monument and grounds to honor the values for which Native Americans stood, and to honor all the indigenous people of North America. Started in 1948, the monument depicts legendary Oglala Lakota warrior, Crazy Horse, riding his horse into battle. Crazy Horse most famously led Native Americans against Custer's Seventh US Calvary in the Battle of Little Bighorn, in which all of Custer's men and himself were killed.

This led to the eradication of the Native American way of life. Located in the Black Hills of South Dakota, the grounds also feature The Indian Museum of North America, Laughing Water Restaurant, and The Native American Educational and Cultural Center. Admission is about $12 per person, and the monument is open 365 days per year.

This led to the eradication of the Native American way of life.

Next up at #5 is Joshua Tree. By the late 1920's the desert of Southern California was under attack from cactus poachers and land developers. Minerva Hoyt became concerned about the removal of cacti and other plants and through efforts got Joshua Tree set aside as a National Monument in 1936.

Home to over eight hundred plant, forty-six reptile, fifty-seven mammal, and over 250 bird species, Joshua Tree is a day trip and camping destination for guests from all over the world. There is no lodging, no grocery stores, and no restaurants inside Joshua Tree, but the areas nearby provide these. With nine campgrounds throughout the park it is considered one of the best places to stargaze in California. Entrance fees are about $30 a vehicle and valid for seven days.

The last landmark on our list at #6, is Cave of the Mounds. Named for the Blue Mounds, Cave of the Mounds is located on the Eastern Mound of two large hills in Southern Wisconsin. Accidentally discovered in 1939 during a limestone excavation for a nearby farm, the cave had to be closed until 1940 in order to preserve it. People were so excited about the prospect of finding a cave over a million years old in the Midwest, that in the first eight weeks of operation there were over 59,000 visitors.

Named for the Blue Mounds, Cave of the Mounds is located on the Eastern Mound of two large hills in Southern Wisconsin.

Designated a National Landmark in 1988, the cave now sits on grounds that offer guests picnic areas, gardens, hiking and bike trails, and other fun activities. One hour guided tours of the cave take place daily on a rotating schedule. No matter what time of year it is the cave maintains a cool fifty degrees, making it a great spot in the summer and winter. Access is about $19 a person.